All Aboard Harvest | Jenna: Want to try a new recipe? Ok!
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Jenna: Want to try a new recipe? Ok!

Jenna: Want to try a new recipe? Ok!

 

Hamlin, Texas – Things have been rolling along fairly well the past couple of days. The fields we’ve been working on have been averaging about 13-16 bushels per acre, which is lower than most of the fields we’ve cut until now but is actually more typical for the area. The real sticklers have been terraced fields, which slow efficiency by up to 30 percent, and long lines at the grain elevator.

Last night, I cooked Callie’s favorite meal, sweet and sour chicken, and it’s so ridiculously easy that I thought it would be a good recipe to share. A fair warning though, it’s not the best meal to haul to the field. (Callie held the dish the whole way out to avoid having a mess, but then ended up with sweet and sour-ness all over her clothes. Ha!)

Sweet and Sour Chicken
(Generally serves six people) 

4-5 boneless, skinless chicken breasts
1 (8 oz.) bottle Russian salad dressing
1 pkg dry onion soup mix
1 (10 oz.) jar apricot preserves

1. Mix together dressing, soup mix and preserves
2. Place chicken breasts in buttered baking dish
3. Pour mixture over chicken
4. Bake at 375 degrees for 45 minutes, or until done

Note: I generally cut the chicken breasts into about 1-inch strips just because…I don’t know…it’s easier to serve that way? I also slice up green pepper and onion and add to the soup mixture. And if your grocery store doesn’t carry Russian dressing (because I’ve found that many don’t), I’ve discovered that Catalina dressing works just as well.

I wish I would’ve thought to take a picture of the dish because, hey, don’t we all like recipes with pictures better? But I didn’t – sorry. Here are some lovely night shots in the field, though.

Semi at night
Dad, in the semi, returns from the long lines at the grain elevator while the combine, with a full hopper, waits to be unloaded (the grain truck was already full).

JMZ_June 7_Combine unloading at night
Mom unloads the combine onto the semi.

Jenna Zeorian can be reached at jenna@allaboardharvest.com. All Aboard 2010 Wheat Harvest is sponsored by High Plains Journal and DuPont Crop Protection

2 Comments
  • Jerry
    Posted at 15:51h, 08 June

    For some reason the pictures aren’t posting again. They were good for a bit, but now they’re gone again.

    Jerry

  • Jada
    Posted at 04:19h, 09 June

    Nice night time photos. They are really neat. I will have to try that recipe out 🙂