All Aboard Harvest | Megan: Oklahoma Harvest From Behind the Camera
3889
post-template-default,single,single-post,postid-3889,single-format-standard,qode-quick-links-1.0,ajax_fade,page_not_loaded,,qode-theme-ver-11.2,qode-theme-bridge,wpb-js-composer js-comp-ver-5.4.7,vc_responsive

Megan: Oklahoma Harvest From Behind the Camera

Megan: Oklahoma Harvest From Behind the Camera

Well, as of this morning we’re still “babysitting” our field near Duke, Oklahoma. We’re in hopes it will dry out enough that we can get going later this afternoon. Yesterday, after looking through all of the photos I have taken in the last couple weeks I realized how many neat ones there really are. I’m the type of person where I see a moment or scene and think, or often enthusiastically say, “photo op!” (which seems to be a college slang term for “photo opportunity”). With that being said, you can only imagine the amount of pictures I have taken since the beginning of our harvest season. Even though the boys often gripe that I’m constantly taking pictures of them and always wear my camera on my hip, I don’t ever want to miss a moment. After all, as the saying goes, “A picture is worth a thousand words.” So please, sit back, get your clicker finger ready, and enjoy some southern Oklahoma harvest – Roland style.

Cattle in the field
A group of cattle from a nearby pasture apparently wanted to come see what all the ruckus was in our field. I only say this because I doubt “the grass is always greener on the other side” applies to this situation. It’s not the first time we’ve cut a field with cows in it, but it’s certainly not a “norm” for us.

Truckers Danny and Greg
Truckers Danny and Greg pose in front of one of the semis.

Planes in flight next door
This is a photo of Air Force planes from Altus, Oklahoma. They could be seen in the sky periodically throughout the day as they had many practice flights over the fields were we cutting. (Photo taken by James)

Packages next door
One day these planes gave us quite the treat as they practiced dropping packages with parachutes in an open field right by where we were cutting. Not something you see every day from inside the combine cab.

Altus 065
James performs maintenance on a header chain.

Flat tire
An old tee post found its way into Brandon’s drive tire. A patch had to be placed so the tire would not leak air and go flat.

Brandon and header
Brandon assesses the damage done to the reel on the header during a breakdown.

Brandon and Ben
Brandon and our farmer, Ben, take a look at the wheat to see if the weekend storms caused any damage. Luckily, it was just heavy rains so hopefully we’ll get back to cutting soon.

James, Brandon, and Ben
James, Brandon, and Ben humor me and pose for a quick photo after working on the tractor and moving around equipment.

Taranchula by the field
We saw this little fella on the way out to our field. We certainly don’t have these tarantula type spiders at home. It makes you think twice before digging into your header the next time there’s a breakdown!  (Photo taken by James)

The rest of these are some scenic harvest photos taken around the Gould and Duke, Oklahoma area.

All Aboard Harvest is sponsored by High Plains Journal and Syngenta. For more information contact Megan at megan@allaboardharvest.com.

No Comments

Sorry, the comment form is closed at this time.