High Plains Journal All Aboard Wheat Harvest


Steph: Hot dog stands
Steph Osowski

Scranton, North Dakota – On one corner, the wheat is days away from being ready to cut. Across the road, the field is grass green and won’t be ready for weeks. A hop and a skip down the road, wheat is being swathed and baled. When the insurance company is paying the farmer to bale rather than harvest, how could you say no? It’s tough for me as a harvester to type that, but I also understand profit margins. Don’t be surprised if harvest crews add some instruments and a hot dog stand to their crew. Just imagine, the crew/band playing some country music and selling hot dogs in the wheat field. Combines park strategically around the bandstand, passing the time before the wheat ripens. Sounds pretty awesome, actually.

Once the duals were put back on and we replaced a couple concaves, Papa T roaded the combine to the first wheat field that we thought would be ready to go. He took a few swipes out of it. We took a sample to the elevator, and that was that. Mind you, the elevator we will actually be hauling to wasn’t open, so I guess it wasn’t meant to be anyway. Sixteen percent moisture just won’t cut it, not to mention the rain on the horizon. However, the protein content was 14, so that makes up for the 54 pound test weight. It’s looking like the harvest is like the rain… somewhere on the horizon.

Quote of the Day – “We got bugs on the bumper and a bear in the air.”

Stuff Harvesters Do – See an abandoned bucket in the ditch? Stop and grab it. You never have enough buckets.
Duals back on.
Duals back on and ready to go.
New versus old.
New concave versus old concave.
Wide open Nodak country.
Wide open Nodak country.
Not quite ready but looks pretty good.
Not quite ready, but it looks pretty good.
Ever tried this? Well, we tried it for you and I'm telling you it's delicious.
Ever tried this? Well, we tried it for you, and I’m telling you it’s delicious.
Papa T, fenangling the concave.
Papa T, fenangling the concave.
Grass green wheat just a few miles down the road from the ripe field.
Grass green wheat just a few miles down the road from the ripe field.
Got a sample cut.
Got a sample cut.
You just never know what will be used for a sample container.
You just never know what will be used for a sample container.
Equity in Hettinger, ND.
The super old, vintage equity in Hettinger, ND.
Combine tires on a cabover -- unreal.
Combine tires on a cabover — unreal.

All Aboard Wheat Harvest is sponsored by High Plains Journal and John Deere. You can contact Steph at stephanie@allaboardharvest.com.
Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Email this to someonePin on PinterestShare on LinkedInShare on RedditShare on Tumblr

6 Responses to Steph: Hot dog stands
Steph Osowski

  1. That Hot Dog Stand is quite a novel & kooky idea Steph !! Must have a Harvester theme on the garnish, John Deere dog – lots of Green relish & a good hit of Yellow mustard. New Holland dogs – two dogs in big bun,Twin Rotor EH ! with lots yellow relish, a sprinkle of blue cheese & topped off with some Walla Walla sweet onions. CaseIH -dog a big ole frank with Red salsa & a good shot of hot sauce plus finish with a dusting of freshly chopped garlic !!!!

    • Another harvester friend of mine has always talked about a hot dog stand. Those are fantastic ideas when it comes to those themes!!

  2. Steph,
    What’s that Cab Over with the tractor tires used for? Looks like it has a fifth wheel plate between the tires, but it also appears to be below the tire height, so a trailer would not work on it.

    Alan VanNahmen

  3. Steph; A lot of grain was hauled from Perkins County, SD in the 40’s and 50’s to the Hettinger Equity. A memory I will have for ever as a 5 year old riding the man lift to the top of the “old house” and looking over the town of Hettinger form those white doors. Keep up the wonderul posts!

Leave a reply