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Category Archives: John Deere

Janel: Nebraska Soybeans and Wet Corn
Janel Schemper

Holdrege, Nebraska – I love this time of year.  Fall is wonderful! Typically, we just work all day every day which is pretty much my favorite thing to do in my life! It’s just easier to go to work. I am happy working and feel my best when I’m harvesting full blast (I think this is true for all harvesters). 

We began cutting soybeans in mid-September and had a good start. Now, this fall harvest has been delayed because we’ve had rain.  We had a three inch rain about ten days ago and that kept me out of the field for three days. I got to harvest five days since and then we just recently had a couple more inches of rain. The forecast this week includes lots of big chances of more rain. I know our customers want their crops harvested and trust us that we do our very best to accomodate. We want to get everyone’s crops harvested as soon as possible. We do understand! This rain is certainly putting us behind schedule.

The soybean yields have been good. The crops in this area are typically irrigated either by pivot or gravity irrigation. The pivot corners may be dryland. However, the pivot corners can be gravity irrigated as well or a swing tower pivot can irrigate most of a typical pivot corner. I did harvest a quarter of soybeans with four dryland corners that yielded 80 plus bushels per acre. The dryland corners are decent this year due to timely rains during the growing season. In fact, it’s been difficult to cut the corners separate if necessary because they look just as good as the irrigated in most fields. 

I have also harvested wet corn this fall and that is a young man’s game. The irrigated corn yields are typically high but this requires a lot of people to get involved aka manpower. One combine can keep busy two tractor grain carts and four trucks. It’s busy business that is for sure. I do enjoy it regardless! The wet corn moisture was 30 percent and the yield was high. 

I’ve recently read my all aboard harvest emails and have gotten so many thanking me for my summer harvest reports and now requesting fall harvest reports and photos. Your wish is coming true! I’m happy to share my fall harvest photos too! It’s such a pretty time of year. I also had emails asking where Moo was at because I didn’t include any pictures of Moo in my last post. Moo is always with me and she keeps me laughing!
I have a funny story about Miss Moo. Four Holdrege FFA girls brought out lunch to our field on Saturday. There was an extra sandwich and I won’t let good food go to waste and so I let Moo have it all! It was a 6-inch turkey and cheese sub sandwich. Moo was so sleepy the rest of the day and slept so much. Turkey contains the amino acid tryptophan that makes people sleepy. Well, it was working well for Moo. I opened a bag of chips a few hours later while combining and she always wants what I’m having. This time she didn’t even hardly wake up. She was sleeping on the floor of the combine cab and I was trying to give her a chip and she was so sleepy she barely opened her eyes and just had no interest in a potato chip. I certainly do believe the myth that turkey makes you sleepy! Moo demonstrated just that! 

I hope you all are enjoying fall. To me, fall is all about lots and lots of harvesting, husker football on the radio on Saturday’s and high school volleyball (Sierra, Samantha and Sabrina are all playing volleyball this fall)! Fall is a great season no doubt about it!

Schemper 2017 - Fall Harvest
Our harvest mood captured in a photo! Miss Moo and I harvesting soybeans in Nebraska in September. (Photo by Janel Schemper)
Schemper 2017 - Fall Harvest
Moo and I harvesting soybeans in Nebraska in September. This is our typical harvest mood! We love it! (Photo by Janel Schemper)
Schemper 2017 - Fall Harvest
Moo sleeps so peacefully in the combine until the header and rotor is shut off then she’s awake. Schemper Harvesting cutting soybeans in Nebraska in September. (Photo by Janel Schemper)
Schemper 2017 - Fall Harvest
We both love AutoTrac! Schemper Harvesting cutting soybeans in Nebraska in September. (Photo by Janel Schemper)
Schemper 2017 - Fall Harvest
Schemper Harvesting cutting soybeans in Nebraska in mid-September. (Photo by Janel Schemper)
Schemper 2017 - Fall Harvest
Schemper Harvesting cutting soybeans in Nebraska in mid-September. The combine operator is Jared Schemper. (Photo by Janel Schemper)
Schemper 2017 - Fall Harvest
Schemper Harvesting cutting soybeans in Nebraska in September. (Photo by Janel Schemper)
Schemper 2017 - Fall Harvest
This is my kind of day! I love picking corn! Schemper Harvesting picking wet corn in Nebraska in September. (Photo by Janel Schemper)
Schemper 2017 - Fall Harvest
I got to go to Samantha Schemper’s volleyball game! She’s a freshman and is a great volleyball player! Sawyer Schemper cheers for her at the games! He says, “go #1, go Sam!” Schemper Harvesting had a rain delay so I got to enjoy Sam’s away game at the new gym in Minden. (Photo by Janel Schemper)
Schemper 2017 - Fall Harvest
This was a truck wash kind of day! Schemper Harvesting was delayed due to a 3 inch rain in Nebraska in September so we keep busy doing shop work. (Photo by Janel Schemper)
Schemper 2017 - Fall Harvest
Moo gets the best naps of a lifetime in the combine cab! Schemper Harvesting cutting soybeans in Nebraska in mid-September. (Photo by Janel Schemper)
Schemper 2017 - Fall Harvest
Schemper Harvesting cutting soybeans in Nebraska in September. (Photo by Janel Schemper)
Schemper 2017 - Fall Harvest
Moo is so wonderful! We were driving Jared’s truck to his field! (Photo by Janel Schemper)
Schemper 2017 - Fall Harvest
Seriously, what a cute little boy! Sterling Schemper is 2 and loves field time! Schemper Harvesting picking wet corn in Nebraska in September. (Photo by Janel Schemper)
Schemper 2017 - Fall Harvest
Sterling loves field time and so does Moo! Schemper Harvesting picking wet corn in Nebraska in September. (Photo by Janel Schemper)
Schemper 2017 - Fall Harvest
Schemper Harvesting picking wet corn in Nebraska in September. (Photo by Janel Schemper)
Schemper 2017 - Fall Harvest
Schemper Harvesting picking wet corn in Nebraska in September. (Photo by Janel Schemper)
Schemper 2017 - Fall Harvest
Sterling enjoying field time! Schemper Harvesting picking wet corn in Nebraska in September. (Photo by Janel Schemper)
Schemper 2017 - Fall Harvest
Schemper Harvesting picking wet corn in Nebraska in September. The combine operator is Lonny Schemper. (Photo by Janel Schemper)
Schemper 2017 - Fall Harvest
Schemper Harvesting cutting soybeans in Nebraska in September. The combine operator is LaVern Schemper. (Photo by Janel Schemper)
Schemper 2017 - Fall Harvest
My mom has too much fun at the shop! Sage and Sterling having fun with Grandma Carlene Schemper! (Photo by Janel Schemper)
Schemper 2017 - Fall Harvest
Schemper Harvesting cutting soybeans in Nebraska in October. (Photo by Janel Schemper)
Schemper 2017 - Fall Harvest
Schemper Harvesting cutting soybeans in Nebraska in October. (Photo by Janel Schemper)
Schemper 2017 - Fall Harvest
Schemper Harvesting cutting soybeans in Nebraska in October. Photo by Janel Schemper)
Schemper 2017 - Fall Harvest
Schemper Harvesting cutting soybeans in Nebraska in October. (Photo by Janel Schemper)
Schemper 2017 - Fall Harvest
I dislike it when this happens. I was pulling weeds off the draper belt and sickle and then this happened. Ouch! Schemper Harvesting cutting soybeans in Nebraska in October. (Photo by Janel Schemper)
Schemper 2017 - Fall Harvest
Sterling and I enjoying combine time together! Schemper Harvesting picking wet corn in Nebraska in September. (Photo by Janel Schemper)
Schemper 2017 - Fall Harvest
Schemper Harvesting picking wet corn in Nebraska in September. (Photo by Janel Schemper)
Schemper 2017 - Fall Harvest
This is the yummy turkey and cheese sub sandwich Moo loved having for lunch one day in the field! Schemper Harvesting cutting soybeans in Nebraska in September. (Photo by Janel Schemper)
Schemper 2017 - Fall Harvest
Schemper Harvesting cutting soybeans in Nebraska in September. (Photo by Carlene Schemper)
Schemper 2017 - Fall Harvest
Schemper Harvesting cutting soybeans in Nebraska in mid-September. (Photo by Carlene Schemper)
Schemper 2017 - Fall Harvest
Joe and Jack Ridder rode in the combine one evening with Janel. This was Jack’s first ever combine ride! Schemper Harvesting cutting soybeans in Nebraska in September. (Photo by Carlene Schemper)
Schemper 2017 - Fall Harvest
Schemper Harvesting cutting soybeans in Nebraska in September. (Photo by Jared Schemper)
Schemper 2017 - Fall Harvest
Samantha Schemper was running combine #3 on a Sunday! Schemper Harvesting cutting soybeans in Nebraska in October.  She’s got combine goals!!  #combinegoals (Photo by Jared Schemper)
Schemper 2017 - Fall Harvest
Samantha Schemper was running combine #3 on a Saturday!  Schemper Harvesting cutting soybeans in Nebraska in September. (Photo by Jared Schemper)

All Aboard Wheat Harvest™ is sponsored by High Plains Journal and John Deere. You can contact Janel at janel@allaboardharvest.com

Janel: North Dakota Didn’t Disappoint
Janel Schemper

Holdrege, Nebraska – We finished harvesting spring wheat and canola in the northeastern North Dakota area just recently. We had harvest weather and put in some good long days of harvesting. It was good and went fast because the weather held!  I enjoyed every single second of it as I love the North Dakota harvest dearly.

We used our pick-up headers to harvest canola. We also cut canola and spring wheat with our MacDon headers. Everything went pretty well. The yields were good and for the first time all harvest, it finally felt like what harvest is supposed to be like!  It was super busy with a clear forecast! We started early in the mornings and worked late into the evenings.  It was just the way I like harvest to be.  We had meals in the field and the equipment and trucks were busy due to high yielding wheat and canola. I was very happy with the acres we did get to harvest. The farmers we work for are absolutely great people and are always very much appreciated. I love harvesting wheat and canola so much in North Dakota that I wished we could have stayed longer and had about another 7 to 10 days of harvest work to do. Canola is one of my favorite crops to harvest.  The scenery is beautiful and the fields are nice in North Dakota. The month of August in North Dakota was dry overall and so there was no mud to deal with, which was a plus. I always look forward to getting to North Dakota and putting in some big days of harvesting and that is just what we got this year. I was sad to have to leave so soon but again the weather was great and we got the crops harvested quickly.

I spent four days traveling from North Dakota to home in Nebraska for our fall harvest. We had a decent trip home but we fought the wind for the majority of the trip. The wind was really terrible one day of the trip home. I myself had to back track for equipment three times. I’m happy to be home now and thankful for a safe trip.  Each year it’s always a stressful one.

Overall, the 2017 summer harvest was the most unusual harvest I’ve experienced yet. I didn’t get to start at our first stop on our harvest route because the wheat acres were short and yields were low.  There were times where we were super busy this summer and then times where all at once we weren’t. There were many harvest ups and downs. I’m ready for fall harvest and will soon be looking forward to the 2018 wheat harvest.

Our entire crew is home now and we’re all getting ready for soybean and corn harvest. I’d like to write another blog or two on soybeans and corn but I’m not for sure if I’ll have a chance to accomplish that but for now I’d like to say thank you to all of the All Aboard Wheat Harvest followers.  I am very happy with High Plains Journal and thankful for this opportunity to share my harvest life through writing and photography. I have certainly appreciated and enjoyed this journey. I am very proud of agribusiness and this beautiful country. The American wheat harvest is amazing to me as well as American agriculture. I’d like to thank our primary partners, John Deere and High Plains Journal, as well as other partners of AAWH including: ITC, Syngenta’s Agri Pro Division, Unverferth, and Oklahoma Baptist Homes for Children. 

I’d like to give a special shout out to my parents, LaVern and Carlene Schemper, today is their 44th wedding anniversary!

Thanks again All Aboard Wheat Harvest followers, High Plains Journal and sponsors. Have a great fall! 

Schemper 2017 Eastern North Dakota Harvest
Schemper Harvesting cutting canola in North Dakota. Lonny Schemper is the combine operator. I love harvesting this field. The scenery is beautiful all the way around the field! (Photo by Janel Schemper)
Schemper 2017 Eastern North Dakota Harvest
This is canola seed. The seed is crushed and oil is extracted. The oil is used for cooking! #canolaoil (Photo by Janel Schemper)
Schemper 2017 Eastern North Dakota Harvest
Schemper Harvesting cutting canola in North Dakota. (Photo by Janel Schemper)
Schemper 2017 Eastern North Dakota Harvest
Schemper Harvesting cutting wheat in North Dakota. (Photo by Janel Schemper)
Schemper 2017 Eastern North Dakota Harvest
Schemper Harvesting cutting wheat in North Dakota. (Photo by Janel Schemper)
Schemper 2017 Eastern North Dakota Harvest
Schemper Harvesting cutting canola in North Dakota. (Photo by Jared Schemper)
Schemper 2017 Eastern North Dakota Harvest
I love my combine shadow! Schemper Harvesting cutting canola in North Dakota. (Photo by Janel Schemper)
Schemper 2017 Eastern North Dakota Harvest
Schemper Harvesting picking up canola in North Dakota. (Photo by Janel Schemper)
Schemper 2017 Eastern North Dakota Harvest
Schemper Harvesting cutting wheat in North Dakota. (Photo by Janel Schemper)
Schemper 2017 Eastern North Dakota Harvest
Schemper Harvesting cutting canola in North Dakota. The combine operator is JC Schemper. (Photo by Janel Schemper)
Schemper 2017 Eastern North Dakota Harvest
Schemper Harvesting cutting canola in North Dakota. Amazing fall colors are just beginning and I enjoy the beautiful scenery as usual in North Dakota. (Photo by Janel Schemper)
Schemper 2017 Eastern North Dakota Harvest
Schemper Harvesting cutting canola in North Dakota. The combine operator is JC Schemper and the tractor grain cart operator is Dennis. (Photo by Janel Schemper)
Schemper 2017 Eastern North Dakota Harvest
Schemper Harvesting cutting wheat in North Dakota. (Photo by Janel Schemper)
Schemper 2017 Eastern North Dakota Harvest
Schemper Harvesting cutting canola in North Dakota. The combine operator is JC Schemper. (Photo by Janel Schemper)
Schemper 2017 Eastern North Dakota Harvest
Schemper Harvesting cutting canola in North Dakota. (Photo by Janel Schemper)
Schemper 2017 - Eastern North Dakota Harvest
Schemper Harvesting finished up on wheat in North Dakota in mid-September. (Photo by Jared Schemper)
Schemper 2017 Eastern North Dakota Harvest
Schemper Harvesting loaded up and on the road going south for fall harvest. Here we were stopped for a quick lunch break. LaVern Schemper is pictured here. (Photo by Janel Schemper)
Schemper 2017 Eastern North Dakota Harvest
Four days of traveling from North Dakota to home and I was thankful for a safe trip home. It’s always a stressful one. (Photo by Janel Schemper)


All Aboard Wheat Harvest is sponsored by High Plains Journal and John Deere. Janel Schemper can be reached at janel@allaboardharvest.com.

Steph: There’s no place like harvest
Steph Osowski

Grafton, ND – Upon leaving Colorado after my Harvest Support adventure left, the Graham Family that I became familiar with (and let me tell you, to know them is to love them) came to bid farewell to me and Monte. The three Graham kids were asking all sorts of questions and the one that stuck out the most was when little Chase exclaims, “I won’t ever see you again!” My heart broke a little because it was so adorable but my response was simple. “Oh yes you will — we’re harvesters!”

The Harvest Support truck finished up the season the last week of August and I’ve been back home ever since. It’s amazing how long a person can be gone from home and it somehow feels like you never left. It is also amazing how dirty my apartment got without anyone actually living in it for months but that’s another story.

Harvest around here is without a doubt in full swing. Wheat is pretty well taken care of so now the transition to fall crops has begun. Between daycare, nannying and hauling potatoes for the harvest, I’ve been anything but idle. Sugar beet harvest will begin first week in October and that’s basically considered a holiday in this area. I kid you not, people use their vacation time from their “day jobs” to come haul beets for local farmers. I even have a friend from college coming up from  Minnesota to get in on the action. It’s a kind of a big deal.

What a roller coaster year, huh? To be honest, nothing surprises me anymore. Growing up a harvester, there’s one thing for certain and that is — nothing is certain. Always expect the unexpected. In fact, expect it with a smile. To me, there’s nothing better than the unexpected because that’s truly when we grow as human beings. Staying in the comfort zone gets you nowhere. High Plains Journal continues to be awesome from year to year, providing me with this program to tell you harvester tales and my gratitude only grows from year to year. A big ol’ thanks also goes to John Deere, Syngenta, Unverferth and the Oklahoma Baptist Homes for Children. You’ll never truly know how appreciative us corespondents are for your support to our livelihood! There’s no place like harvest.

You might be asking yourself, “where in the world will Steph go next?” Well, I’ll be heading to South Africa again this winter and scheduled a couple solo trips on my way home (Abu Dhabi, UAE and Nice, France). Once you get the travel bug, it demands serious attention. And as recently discovered, more and more attention each year. I read somewhere that you weren’t born to just work, pay bills and die. Kind of a harsh way to put it but, I plan to have many stories for the rocking chair when I grow old.

Until next year — I wish everyone a prosperous fall harvest and a safe and toasty winter. Happy harvest!

Quote of the Day – “Why’d you break it? Grandpa wants to work.”

Stuff Harvesters Do –
Naturally gravitate towards other harvesters. In a crowd, at a restaurant, attending a concert… anywhere.

Cabover Alert FINAL:
C&K Harvesting – 115
Anderson Harvesting – 131.5
MacDon Harvest Support – 73

Rainbow captured on the way out of Colorado.
Rainbow captured on the way out of Colorado.
Repping the HarvestHer brand!
Repping the HarvestHer brand!
Unloading the potatoes out of the the live-bottom truck I'm driving for Lone Wolf Farms.
Unloading the potatoes out of the the live-bottom truck I’m driving for Lone Wolf Farms out of Minto, ND.
At the warehouse where all the trucks unload.
At the warehouse where all the trucks unload.
Conveying their way into the warehoue.
Conveying their way into the warehouse.
Sunrising on the day.
Sunrising on the day.
Heart shaped potato!
Heart shaped potato! See, carbs really are love.
Mounds and mounds of taters.
Mounds and mounds of taters.
Lone Wolf Farms; est. 1938. 4000 total acres that vary between potatoes, sugar beets, wheat and soybeans. Classic family farm ran by 2 brothers (Chris, Josh) their dad (Keith) and grandfather (Dean). The fave color is, of course, "red like the potatoes."
Lone Wolf Farms; est. 1938. 4000 total acres that vary between potatoes, sugar beets, wheat and soybeans. Classic family farm ran by 2 brothers (Chris, Josh) their dad (Keith) and grandfather (Dean). Their fave color is, of course, “red like the potatoes.”
Potatoes is all about moving parts.
Potatoes is all about moving parts.
Trucker selfie in my HarvestHer shirt.
Trucker selfie in my HarvestHer shirt.
Sunrise.
Sunrise.
Nanny life. That face he made was PRICELESS.
Nanny life. That face he made was PRICELESS.
Had to include a couple favorites from the wheat run.
Had to include a couple favorites from the wheat run.
Happy harvest!
Happy harvest!

All Aboard Wheat Harvest is sponsored by High Plains Journal and John Deere. You can contact Steph at stephanie@allaboardharvest.com.

Janel: Legendary Jamestown, North Dakota
Janel Schemper

Jamestown, North Dakota – This Jamestown, North Dakota farm we are currently on is “almost” like home sweet home and has become a special place to me as we’ve been coming here since 1989.  This farm family is one amazing farm family.  I really appreciate all of them and getting to visit with them when we are here harvesting.  I went home to Nebraska for school from this farm many times.  When I think about all of the harvest memories I have here it’s just a big ol reminder of how time flies.  I can remember riding in the combine here with my sister and falling asleep in the buddy seat and also riding in the truck with my mom and hauling all of the loads of spring wheat and barley to grain bins on the farm.  This past year my mom found a picture of me running combine and on the back of the picture it said, “Jamestown, North Dakota 1994.”  I wasn’t even a teenager yet and I could run a combine all by myself!  It’s all amazing to me at how time really does just fly by!

I’ve been told it’s a drought year here but all of the crops look good to me. We have been cutting spring wheat and the yields have been in the 55 to 65 bushels per acre range, the test weights have been 60 plus and the protein has been good at 15 and 16 percent.  The wheat was not sprayed and the grain wasn’t too dry.  Almost every load was 15 percent moisture or higher.  The cutting conditions have been rather tough as well.  Howard Hale called me while I was out cutting wheat and we discussed the low wheat acres, high row crop acres and the cutting conditions.  I always enjoy getting a call from Howard Hale for a Harvest USA report.  I listen to his morning and afternoon programs almost daily.

However, our run here was short because there just aren’t that many wheat acres here anymore. Almost everything is planted to corn and soybeans.  I can remember when everything in the Jamestown area was spring wheat and barley and every acre was windrowed.  I can’t believe how things have changed so much.  We’ll finish up and get moved up to the Grand Forks, North Dakota area and harvest spring wheat and canola.  The forecast looks sunny for 10 days so hopefully just maybe we can have a good run at our next and last stop on our wheat harvest run! 

Schemper 2017 - North Dakota Wheat Harvest
Just look at those beautiful North Dakota colors! (Photo by Janel Schemper)
Schemper 2017 - North Dakota Wheat Harvest
A beautiful day of harvesting spring wheat near Jamestown, North Dakota. (Photo by Janel Schemper)
Schemper 2017 - North Dakota Wheat Harvest
Wheat is my favorite North Dakota crop. This year there is so much corn planted here. (Photo by Janel Schemper)
Schemper 2017 - North Dakota Wheat Harvest
My brother Jared Schemper has been driving truck lately hauling grain from the field to the elevator. I like it better though when he is in his combine in the field. I enjoy harvesting crops with him because he is the best combine operator. (Photo by Janel Schemper)
Schemper 2017 - North Dakota Wheat Harvest
It’s a drought year and this wheat field still produced 65 bushel spring wheat! (Photo by Janel Schemper)
Schemper 2017 - North Dakota Wheat Harvest
These are lentils. Jared Schemper brought me a sample of lentils from Montana.  Lentils look like certs and are as soft as silk. (Photo by Janel Schemper)
Schemper 2017 - North Dakota Wheat Harvest
These are chickpeas. Jared Schemper brought me a sample of chickpeas from Montana. I think they look like mini pumpkins. (Photo by Janel Schemper)
Schemper 2017 - North Dakota Wheat Harvest
Harvesting spring wheat on a cloudy day in North Dakota. (Photo by Janel Schemper)
Schemper 2017 - North Dakota Wheat Harvest
Harvesting spring wheat on a cloudy day in North Dakota. The combine operator is LaVern Schemper. (Photo by Janel Schemper)
Schemper 2017 - North Dakota Wheat Harvest
Harvesting spring wheat on a cloudy day in North Dakota. (Photo by Janel Schemper)
Schemper 2017 - North Dakota Wheat Harvest
I love this time of day! Combine shadows followed by a sunset! (Photo by Janel Schemper)
Schemper 2017 - North Dakota Wheat Harvest
I can remember harvesting this field when I was 12 years old. It was planted to barley and was making nearly 100 bushels an acre. We had three combines and the combine operators were JC, Jared and me. I remember we had everything full and were sitting there waiting on a truck to come back to the field. It was mid-August and it was just about time for us to go back home to Nebraska for school. I remember JC and Jared having a conversation about being concerned about what Dad was going to do for help since we were leaving for school. Jared was 15 and was excited to get back home for football and I loved playing volleyball. We were Dad’s crew and it was always sad to leave harvest but yet we were excited to get back to school and play sports! (Photo by Janel Schemper)


All Aboard Wheat Harvest is sponsored by High Plains Journal and John Deere. Janel Schemper can be reached at janel@allaboardharvest.com.

Steph: Change of scenery (again)
Steph Osowski

Monte Vista, CO – Harvest is unpredictable. If you’ve heard it once, you’ve heard it a thousand times over from each individual correspondent. This year has brought around many changes for individual harvesters and crews alike and in the spirit of that, another change has occurred in my usually predictable summer schedule.

Given the amount of acres burned up in western ND, the acres promised ended up not being the acres given. Having a full crew with less acres than you bargained for is a difficult situation to be in. Right as all this was happening, there was an opportunity for me to join the New Holland Harvest Support team for the duration of harvest. 

So, here I am, from harvest crew member to Harvest Support member, from campground to Holiday Inn. Monte and I got to the San Luis Valley in Colorado just a couple days ago and have been making field visits to the Graham’s who live and harvest in this area. Barley harvest will be in full swing come the weekend but some progress has been made, slow as it may be. This area is unbelievably beautiful — I find myself gawking at my surroundings frequently in a day and being grateful for the opportunity to be in the location as well as the position I’m in. What a summer, huh?

Quote of the Day – “Did the combine always rumble like that or can I only hear it now since I got my new hearing aids?”

Stuff Harvesters Do – Consider beef jerky its own food group.
Grain cart selfie!
Grain cart selfies! Chase, myself and Casey.
The background is to die for.
The background is to die for.
Way too cool.
Way too cool.
The Rockies.
The Rockies.
Monte of Harvest Support, likely giving some combine advice to the Graham girls.
Monte of Harvest Support, likely giving some combine advice to a couple of the Graham girls.
Shelby to my right, Chase at my hip. These kids are great! Just mising Haedyn.
Shelby to my right, Chase at my hip. These kids are great! Just missing Haedyn, who is behind the camera taking the photo. Some true harvest kids right here.
Chase riding with his mama, Casey, in the grain cart.
Chase riding with his mama, Casey, in the grain cart.
That face though... ha ha!
That face though… ha ha!
Blowing dust.
Blowing barley dust in every which way.
Love all the wildflowers growing in all the ditches.
Love all the wildflowers growing EVERYWHERE.
Unloading on Casey in the grain cart.
Unloading on Casey in the grain cart.
Chase reminds me SO much of my brother when he was little.
Chase reminds me SO much of my brother when he was little.
Trucks all lined up (with a gorgeous mountain backdrop to boot).
Trucks all lined up (with a gorgeous mountain backdrop to boot).
Dave and his epic mustache.
Dave and his epic mustache.
All Aboard Wheat Harvest is sponsored by High Plains Journal and John Deere. You can contact Steph at stephanie@allaboardharvest.com.

Janel: One Day At A Time
Janel Schemper

Pierre, South Dakota – We’ve been in the Pierre, South Dakota area since mid-July and we’ve been working but it’s been a slow progress. We’ve dealt with several rain showers (which have brought some relief from the summer drought), high humidity and a few cloudy days.  It’s also been one day at a time waiting on fields of spring wheat to ripen.  It takes heat, wind and lots of sunshine to get the wheat to ripen and lately the temperature has been mostly in just the high seventies.

We could finish here in South Dakota pretty soon if the weather would just cooperate.  Today, it’s cloudy with high humidity.  We need the sun to shine so we can get done before it rains again!  The last few fields of spring wheat we harvested yielded 38 to 50 bushels per acre.  The protein has been 17-20 percent and the test weights have been 55 to 59 pounds.  That’s pretty good for a drought year.  The later planted wheat on summer fallow was more successful this year.  I had a Harvest USA report with Howard Hale a week ago and we discussed how the wheat acres were short this year and there are lots of row crops planted including soybeans, corn and sunflowers. 

When we get all finished up here we will be moving up to North Dakota (one of my favorite states on our route) to harvest spring wheat and canola. North Dakota is an amazing place to be and the people there are simply great.  I enjoy all of our harvest days spent there!  I look forward to the cool mornings and evenings as well as harvesting good crops!  I’m also excited to go to a private garden we are welcome to each year to get sweet corn, carrots, cucumbers, tomatoes and lots of great vegetables.  My favorite garden fresh vegetables are North Dakota tomatoes!  Yum!

Schemper 2017 - South Dakota Wheat Harvest
This is our harvest mood captured in a photo! Moo and I cutting wheat in South Dakota.  (Photo by Janel Schemper)
Schemper 2017 - South Dakota Wheat Harvest
Miss Moo is one of a kind in every way. (Photo by Janel Schemper)
Schemper 2017 - South Dakota Wheat Harvest
It was such a beautiful evening I just took a few seconds to get out of the combine and take a quick picture of this volunteer sunflower in the wheat field!  It was pretty!  (Photo by Janel Schemper)
Schemper 2017 - South Dakota Wheat Harvest
I love wheat harvest and all of the beautiful fields I get to cut with my Dad! (Photo by Janel Schemper)
Schemper 2017 - South Dakota Wheat Harvest
Miss Moo loves her job! Here we are harvesting spring wheat near Pierre, South Dakota. (Photo by Janel Schemper)
Schemper 2017 - South Dakota Wheat Harvest
Harvesting spring wheat at night near Pierre, South Dakota. (Photo by Janel Schemper)
Schemper 2017 - South Dakota Wheat Harvest
Harvesting spring wheat near Pierre, South Dakota. (Photo by Janel Schemper)
Schemper 2017 - South Dakota Wheat Harvest
Harvesting spring wheat near Pierre, South Dakota. (Photo by Janel Schemper)
Schemper 2017 - South Dakota Wheat Harvest
Cutting wheat near Pierre, South Dakota. This spring wheat yielded 50 bushels per acre.  The later planted wheat on summer fallow was more successful this year.  (Photo by Janel Schemper)
Schemper 2017 - South Dakota Wheat Harvest
I’ve been harvesting wheat here in the Pierre, South Dakota area since mid-July and have seen a beautiful orange moon several nights lately and it’s always very pretty! (Photo by Janel Schemper)
Schemper 2017 - South Dakota Wheat Harvest
A volunteer sunflower in a wheat field I harvested near Pierre, South Dakota. (Photo by Janel Schemper)
Schemper 2017 - South Dakota Wheat Harvest
I enjoy washing our equipment and trucks especially when it’s warm outside. Here I am washing the tractor. (Photo by Carlene Schemper)
Schemper 2017 - South Dakota Wheat Harvest
This is grain bin work. (Photo by Janel Schemper)


All Aboard Wheat Harvest is sponsored by High Plains Journal and John Deere.  Janel Schemper can be reached at janel@allaboardharvest.com

Janel: Montana Nearly Complete
Janel Schemper

Great Falls, Montana – Our crews in Montana will be finishing up soon. They have been harvesting there since mid-July and have kept busy and had decent harvest weather. I asked my brothers JC and Jared for a crop report and pictures and they delivered. The spring wheat made 43 bushels an acre for an average, the test weights were 58 and 59 pounds and the protein was 15% plus. The chickpeas made 35 to 40 bushels per acre and did very well. They’ll be finishing up on lentils soon and they’ve been yielding 27 bushels per acre for an average.  

When they finish up in Montana they’ll be going to North Dakota next to harvest spring wheat and canola. Our 10 day forecast for our next stop is mostly sunny and seventy degree weather. However, there are a few days in there with a chance of storms. 

Schemper 2017 - Montana Harvest
Schemper Harvesting cutting wheat near Great Falls, Montana. (Photo by Jared Schemper)
Schemper 2017 - Montana Harvest
Schemper Harvesting cutting lentils near Great Falls, Montana. (Photo by Jared Schemper)
Schemper 2017 - Montana Harvest
Schemper Harvesting cutting wheat near Great Falls, Montana. (Photo by Jared Schemper)
Schemper 2017 - Montana Harvest
Schemper Harvesting cutting lentils near Great Falls, Montana. (Photo by Jared Schemper)
Schemper 2017 - Montana Harvest
Schemper Harvesting cutting lentils near Great Falls, Montana. (Photo by Jared Schemper)
Schemper 2017 - Montana Harvest
Schemper Harvesting cutting wheat near Great Falls, Montana. It’s nice harvesting right next to the elevator where the grain is being hauled.  That’s a beautiful field of wheat! (Photo by JC Schemper)
Schemper 2017 - Montana Harvest
This is my nephew Sage Schemper at Shep’s burial site. Shep was a sheep dog. This is a tourist attraction in Fort Benton, Montana. If you read the story about Shep you’ll understand he was forever faithful.  (Photo by JC Schemper)
Schemper 2017 - Montana Harvest
Schemper Harvesting cutting chickpeas near Great Falls, Montana. (Photo by Jared Schemper)
Schemper 2017 - Montana Harvest
Schemper Harvesting cutting wheat near Great Falls, Montana. (Photo by JC Schemper)
Schemper 2017 - Montana Harvest
Schemper Harvesting cutting chickpeas near Great Falls, Montana. (Photo by JC Schemper)
Schemper 2017 - Montana Harvest
Schemper Harvesting cutting wheat near Great Falls, Montana. (Photo by Jared Schemper)
Schemper 2017 - Montana Harvest
Schemper Harvesting cutting chickpeas near Great Falls, Montana. They unload the chickpeas onto the truck instead of using a tractor grain cart that way the grain is handled less.  (Photo by Jared Schemper)
Schemper 2017 - Montana Harvest
Schemper Harvesting unloading at the elevator near Great Falls, Montana. (Photo by JC Schemper)
Schemper 2017 - Montana Harvest
Schemper Harvesting cutting chickpeas near Great Falls, Montana. (Photo by JC Schemper)


All Aboard Wheat Harvest is sponsored by High Plains Journal and John Deere.  Janel Schemper can be reached at janel@allaboardharvest.com.

Steph: Anti-habitual
Steph Osowski

Mandan, ND – My mom got asked by my neighbor when I’m coming home. He also asked if the reason I’m never home is because I work for the FBI. My only hope is that her answer was, “that’s classified.”

This topic is something that has probably been brought up by everyone I know so I feel the need to touch on it. Not just for me but for harvesters everywhere. And also, for anyone who spends time on the road for work. I’ve been asked the same questions umpteen times, year after year; When are you coming home? How long will you be gone? Don’t you miss home? As an economics major, the answer to 99.9 percent of economic questions is “it depends” and the same goes for harvest/agriculture. The newest question that has arose is “when are you going to get a real job?”

Now, that last question can be taken many ways. How do I take it? Simple. A “real job” is one that pays you and most importantly, one that you can enjoy. Harvest is what I enjoy… I have even more passion for it than I realize. It has always been the center of the year, everything else falling in place around it. Harvest is the constant and everything else fills in the blanks. May till October/November are the busiest months of the year, working long hours seven days a week. The months when other people take time off and go to the lake are the months harvesters work the most; the months the money is made. The other months are for less time-constraining activities. Those off-months have given me the opportunity of freedom and flexibility and those are the two things that keep me going on those sporadic days when I catch myself wishing I could have some free time without a steering wheel to control. Harvest has probably ruined my chances of ever being happy at a desk job, but it has opened so many other doors that I think I can forgive it for that. Harvest is my real job and always will be.

As for the harvest in western ND, it’s been a slow moving process. The wheat has taken its time turning and elevators are only open till 5pm on account of lack of truck traffic. And on top of all that, rain showers have sailed through the area followed by moderate temperatures so the wheat doesn’t dry up as quickly as it could be. Unreal — August in North Dakota and the average temperature has been 70 degrees. Comfortable, but wheat likes heat and wind.

Cabover Alert update;
C&K Harvesting – 109
Anderson Harvesting – 115
MacDon Harvest Support – 63.5

Quote of the Day “Nothing haunts me like the cabovers I missed.”

Stuff Harvesters Do – While driving from place to place, crane your neck so bad that it almost cracks in half in an attempt to watch other combines cutting to see what kind of job their doing.
Wheat and sunflowers?! Too beautiful.
Wheat and sunflowers?! Too beautiful.
Sunflowers.
Sunflowers.
Sunflower field.
Sunflower field.
Long distance combine.
Long distance combine.
Almost a full load.
Almost a full load.
Neverending North Dakota country.
Never-ending North Dakota country.
Wheat as far as the eye can see.
Wheat as far as the eye can see.
Closeup.
Close-up.
Meet Ryker! New crewmember from Apache, Okla.
Meet Ryker! New crewmember from Apache, Okla.
A rare photo of me in the wheat field... ha ha!
A rare photo of me in the wheat field… ha ha!

 

Never a dull moment out here.
Never a dull moment out here.
All Aboard Wheat Harvestis sponsored by High Plains Journal and John Deere. You can contact Steph at stephanie@allaboardharvest.com.

Steph: Harvester’s hangout – part 2
Steph Osowski

Scranton, North Dakota – You know how when someone goes, “Hey, tell me a story,” and you draw a total and utterly complete blank? Then later on when you’re going about your daily life, the perfect story comes to mind, and you think “Dang, too bad I couldn’t have thought of that earlier.” Well, pretty sure that’s how this whole “harvester’s hangout” segment is going to go. Therefore, I bring you part two.

  1. It seems every year, there is one specific song that is the “song of the summer.” Back in 2006, the song was Love Today by Mika. He was quite the European pop sensation back then, but he has fallen off the grid since. Anyway, this guy is a soprano. It’s pretty insane. When the crew was in Ogallala, Nebraska, we took the crew out to the lake. So my mom, dad, brother, myself and three hired hands were all piled into the Suburban heading back, and this song comes on. By this point in the summer, everyone knew it pretty well given how often it just so happened to be played. The whole Suburban was singing along to the song, and to this day, I don’t know how no windows were broken.
  2. Just like the “song of the summer,” there always seems to be a “movie of the summer.” Back in the late 90s, my dad purchased Happy Gilmore on VHS. We wore that thing out. I remember sitting in the living room of the fifth wheel Country Aire my parents used to have and trying to decide what movie to watch, and somehow, we would keep going back to it. The whole crew quoted the movie incessantly and to this day, I can still quote the entire movie word for word.
  3. This one was told to me by Papa T, so this is an Anderson Harvesting original. Last harvest in Texas, the crew went to town for groceries and also purchased a grill. Rather than buying a grill that would need to be put together, they wanted the one on display to be able to get to the actual grilling that much sooner. Once all the groceries and grill were packed away into the pickup, they grabbed the grill and shook it, seeing how stable it was. Feeling confident, they decided not to strap it down and head back. Not far down the road, they met a Peterbilt pulling a cattle trailer, flying down the highway. The sheer forces of speed and suction lifted the grill and groceries out of the back of the pickup, and they decorated the highway. There were pickles and peanut butter everywhere. One of the hired hands was devastated about the pickles and managed to salvage a few by picking them up off the highway and eating them. Believe it or not — the grill survived! However, when they left Texas, the grill ended up getting left in the haste of harvest transition.

Enjoy and happy harvest!

All Aboard Wheat Harvest is sponsored by High Plains Journal and John Deere. You can contact Steph at stephanie@allaboardharvest.com.

Lindsey: On the homestretch
lindseyo

Hardin, Montana – We’ve made our way up the harvest trail to our final stop in Hardin. Since we left home, we’ve made stops in McDonald, Kansas, Sidney, Nebraska and Chadron, Nebraska.

We made it to McDonald on June 26th. The combine didn’t see much action, but we were blessed to be able to help out another harvest crew with our support equipment. The rain seemed to move in almost every evening while we were there. When the combine was in the field, we saw 60 bushels per acre yields. Continue Reading