High Plains Journal All Aboard Wheat Harvest
All Aboard Wheat Harvest Combine Cam

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My Momma is Awesome
Emma Misener

Elk City, Ok — Every year I think I say the same thing but it bears repeating! My Momma is such an excellent cook and I am amazed how she can keep up and find new things to cook. I like cooking, but the hardest part for me it to think of something TO cook. Mom has had years of practice and it definitely shows. Thank you, Momma, for doing what you do best. You keep us all in line and take care of us like no other. You are very much loved not only for your cooking, but because you are awesome and are worthy of a post of your very own. I thank God you are mine! Here are just a few things that we get to eat. No special reason for these amazing things, believe me this is her normal cooking.
These are called ‘Good-for-you muffins’. Basically its a bran muffin with walnuts and raisins, but it literally tastes like heaven. My favorite. What’s a muffin without lots of butter?! 
Emma:elk city and beyond
Emma:elk city and beyond
Elk city repairs and fun
This is the best pie in the whole wide world. My favorite upon favorites, ‘Strawberry-Rhubarb Pie’.
Emma: mommas awesome food
Emma: mommas awesome food

The 10th was her 60th birthday! We celebrated by a surprise get together with family at our local Mexican restaurant, Pedro’s. It was a fun time. Then we headed back to Granny’s house (aka Momma) and had cake and opened presents. The cake was a mutual effort between my sister Katie, Liz and I. I have to say it turned out great! Just what we all hoped it would look like.
Emma: mommas birthday
Emma: mommas birthday
Emma: mommas birthday
A couple days later we gave her another birthday present. She’s been wanting to paint her kitchen. Well, job accomplished! She now has nice, bright red walls! Her favorite color. Happy Birthday, Momma. You are a special woman. I love you. Here’s to many more birthdays to come!

Be safe and God bless!

All Aboard Wheat Harvest is sponsored by High Plains Journal and New Holland Agriculture. Emma can be reached at emma@allaboardharvest.com.

Ruts on Ruts
Steph Osowski

Grafton, ND – They say you learn something new every day. Well, yesterday I learned that there is truly no shame in turning your rear-wheel assist on and leaving it on throughout the entire field. It’s better to be safe than sorry, right? That is the name of the game with these wet fields. We are all but tip-toeing through these fields and sometimes, even our tip-toes sink. The protein has remained between 14 and 15 for content so the farmers are being more lenient than usual with the moisture (rather than only cutting at 13 percent or lower, somewhere in the 14s works to ensure the wheat comes off the field). The kick they receive for having high protein more than makes up for it.

Yesterday, we field hopped. We would make a pass, take the sample to town and see if a second pass was possible. The first field has a 16.2 percent moisture reading so that was a no-go. The second field had a 17 percent moisture reading so our odds were decreasing rapidly. The third field we tried had a great moisture reading, 13 percent! The only problem was that the ground was as soft as a sponge and couldn’t hold the combine up for longer that 500 feet. We got so stuck that it took a tug with Farmer Brian’s four-wheel drive tractor plus another tug from our very own four-wheel drive Versatile that we had to fetch from our farm.

The final attempt at combine progress was me taking the unstuck combine 10-miles west to another farmer’s field, Farmer Lloyd. Half a pass later and I was on the verge of getting stuck. In the words of Dad, “We’ve banged our heads against the wall enough today, just park it.”

Bread Count – We no longer haul the grain for the farmers because they all have their own trucks, so I must discontinue the bread count. But we had a good run!

Quote of the Day“Suck it up buttercup, we are finishing this field.” (an attempt at giving the combine a pep talk)
Towing the rope.
Towing the rope.
To the frame.
Sunk to the frame.
Got a little lean.
Got a little lean to it.
And we're stuck again.
These photos are starting to look familiar, I can imagine.
4-wheel drive to the rescue.
4-wheel drive to the rescue!
Blowin' smoke.
Blowin’ smoke.
Dad and Farmer Brian.
Dad and Farmer Brian, discussing the situation at hand.
More ruts.
And some more ruts.
Checking out the wheat.
Checking out the wheat.
Green stubble.
Green stubble.
Almost my favorite part of the day!
Almost my favorite part of the day! Can you guess what it is?
Unloading on the go.
Unloading on the go.
Ahh yes, sunset love.
Ahh yes, sunset love.
There goes another day.
There goes another day.

All Aboard Wheat Harvest™ is sponsored by High Plains Journal and New Holland Agriculture. You can contact Steph at stephanie@allaboardharvest.com.

A New Place…A New Crop
Z Crew

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Monte Vista, Colorado –
We made the trip up and over the LaVeta Pass with the Beast last Thursday with no issues. Once we arrived at our destination, we unloaded the combine and knew we wouldn’t be back until after we got the pick-up header in Goodland, KS. We thought that would be the next day. However, once the call was made, we found out it wasn’t ready to get picked up and we wouldn’t be able to get it until Monday afternoon. So, our plans changed – as they sometimes do. I tried to convince Jim we should go home for the weekend but he sorta frowned on that idea. Jamie and Curt were going to be starting to move into their new home and Callie was moving into her dorm. I really did want to be there for both of those events. But, as most harvesters know…when there is work to be done, there are lots of things we miss at home. The sacrifices are part of the job.
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Callie was lucky to have her sisters to help her with the move. It looks like they had everything in its place in no time. I’m certainly anxious to get home and see her new “home!” And to see Jamie and Curt’s new home!
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Flaps are up…it’s time for liftoff…well, sorta.
We made the trip to Goodland, KS on Monday – late morning. By the time we had the header loaded and were heading down the road again, it was mid afternoon. We had made the decision not to take the trailer house over the hill and would stay in a motel instead. This meant packing clothes, office supplies, groceries, toiletries, shoes, etc – basically everything we needed for the time we’d be away. I tell ya what…those of you who stay in a motel the entire harvest journey have earned my respect! It’s not so bad, except it’s not home. And making due with what you have is something I can do but it certainly isn’t as easy as having everything in its place in a “home.” Making lunches takes on a whole different feel in a motel!
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Servicing included oiling chains before beginning the barley harvest.
We were up early on Tuesday morning. Again, Jim wanted to get over the pass before the heat of the day. Both pickups were going to be hauling headers – the MacDon Flex Head and the MacDon Pick-up head. All our stuff was packed and we were ready to go by 8:00. The trip was pretty uneventful except for one issue. As we were starting to make our way up the pass, I heard a loud bang. It sounded like something hit the side of the pickup. I called Jim on the two-way and told him what I heard and thought maybe we should stop and check it out. After walking around the pickup and header trailer, we couldn’t see anything that looked out of place so we started up the hill again. I heard it again – only louder this time. So, Jim decided he’d drive the service truck and see if it did it again. When we reached our destination, I asked him if it ever made that noise again. He shook his head, “no.” Then said, “Why do you always want to try to give me a heart attack?” I asked him what he meant because I would never do something like that on purpose. He said, “look in the backseat of the pickup – there you will find the noise you heard”. I looked. All I saw were the few boxes of items that we packed and a bag which held several bags of potato chips. That’s when I realized the loud noises I heard were actually the bags of chips popping open due to the change in elevation. It seriously sounded like a tire blew or a gun shot. A bag of potato chips…

We unloaded our living necessities in the motel and took off for the combine. We had some servicing that needed to be done before we could get back in the field again. We took the rest of the day to do that and to also put a new tarp on Frank. The old one was 16 years old and began showing wear this summer. Thanks to Steve Molstad and Colby Canvaswe now have a brand new tarp. Colby Canvas also created our window covering a couple of years ago. Steve and his gang do a great job and I would highly recommend Colby Canvas! They know and understand the needs of the harvester.
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While putting the new tarp on Frank, the wind decided to come up – quite strong, I might add. So, while Jim was attempting to attach the tarp to the metal frame, I was attempting to hold the tarp in place so it wouldn’t blow off the truck. That was a funny sight, I’m sure!
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Pretty certain the sunset pictures are going to be way more than necessary!
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The San Luis Valley is a high-altitude desert with an annual rainfall of 7″. Everything that is grown here is kept alive with water coming from a pivot (and there are a lot of pivots here). This area will rarely, if ever, see a 1″-2″ rain like we experience in the lower elevations. The Valley is surrounded by mountains and is absolutely gorgeous. So far, I’ve seen potatoes, barley, lettuce, canola and hemp being grown here. We haven’t been able to really explore but I’m hoping before we have to leave, I can see more of the valley’s agriculture.
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Interesting house, wouldn’t you say?
We were ready to begin cutting on Wednesday afternoon. We moved the combine and trucks to the field we were to start in and cut about 100 yards. The sample was taken to the elevator and the result was too wet. The sample was 18.2% and it needs to be 12-13% like wheat. So, we moved our equipment down the road about 15 miles and made the initial cut into the field to take a sample. The farmer took off with it and would call us with the results. In the meantime, the rain began to get closer and closer. Just as the farmer called to let us know the moisture test was 11%, it began raining. So, we called it a day as it was after 6:00 p.m. when it started to rain.
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Moving to field #2. I took this picture because it just has agriculture written all over it! The truck was hauling barley, the swather would be used to swath barley and then there’s the combine. I was stopped while I took the picture. The truck was turning right and I wanted to make sure he had plenty of room to make his turn.
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Barley looks a lot like wheat only the heads are much longer. I should have taken a picture of the grain in my hands – I’ll do that another time to show the difference between the two grains. Most barley is swathed and laying on the ground by now. Because of the weather, some of the farmers have opted to leave it stand and use the same header used for wheat. When it’s laying on the ground, we will use the pick-up header. The majority of the barley grown in this area will be used by Coors for beer. 

We were able to get started yesterday. It’s a very slow process – not anything like the craziness of wheat harvest! We didn’t get a very early start this morning because of the rain the night before and I was only able to get 50 acres cut today before we had to shut down for the night. I lacked 10 acres of getting our first half circle done. The reason for the slow going is because the straw is still green (very green in places) and it’s yielding so well. The monitor shows an average of 150 – with a patch or two that makes the monitor move in the 300’s.  Oh well. It’s a new place, a new crop and there’s a whole lot of learning to do!

Jim took this video. It isn’t a very clear video but gives you a fairly good idea of the area around the grain bins that he’s been hauling to. 


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No words needed.

All Aboard Wheat Harvest™ is sponsored by High Plains Journal and New Holland Agriculture. The Z Crew can be reached at zcrew@allaboardharvest.com.

Long Time No Wheat
Steph Osowski

Grafton, ND – Usually when we get home, it’s a whirlwind of activities. We no soon drive through the city limits and we have farmers calling to see what place in cutting order their wheat fields fall into. I know I’ve repeatedly mentioned the rain but it is repeatedly falling and messing up our schedule so I’m left with no choice. All the rain our area has received has made and will continue to make harvest intermittent this season. Some farmers in the area have made so many ruts that they are waiting till it dries out to finish and if it doesn’t, pray their insurance agent is having a good day the day they tell them how much crop they will be forced to leave in the ground.

Protein content has been out of this world at 14.2 and the moisture has been about 13 to 14 percent the last couple days that we have been able to harvest. Our Farmer Brian told us that even if the moisture goes a little high, he wants us to cut it just to get it off (God bless bin dryers). We still got the combine stuck today (again) but we moved to another quarter a few miles away and were able to keep the wheels of all machines above ground and turning. Something so simple but something we have taken for granted the last couple weeks so, today was a good day.

Also, I remembered my camera today. Score!
I missed my camera.
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Grain cart.
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Here comes the service truck.
Here comes the service truck.
Dad fixing on the header.
Dad fixing on the header.
Back in the wheat.
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End of the field action.
End of the field action.
Oh the pretty lighting.
Oh the pretty lighting.
The sun was my friend today.
The sun was my friend today.
Combine.
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Dust! A rare sight these days.
Dust! A rare sight these days.
Spotted; Brandon having a combine date with his girlfriend.
Spotted; Brandon having a combine date with his girlfriend, Shawna.
Sun sets on the day.
Sun sets on the day.
Purple.
Purple.
Farmer Brian.
Farmer Brian, all smiles.
Dusk cutting.
Dusk cutting.
Riding shotgun in the grain cart.
Riding shotgun in the grain cart.
Never a bad time to wash windows.
Never a bad time to wash windows.

All Aboard Wheat Harvest™ is sponsored by High Plains Journal and New Holland Agriculture. You can contact Steph at stephanie@allaboardharvest.com.

Blessing in Disguise
Emma Misener

Elk City, Ok — Being at home here in Elk City when we could be harvesting on the road somewhere, can kind of take a toll on us. You get to thinking you’re a failure because you cannot find work or you begin to doubt yourself. But as I wrote in my last post, it is all in the way you look at things. Your perspective means everything. Yes it is hard not knowing where we will be next, if we will have enough work to get us by for the year, or if we are gonna make it. But, I also know that trusting in God to know where we are at this very moment, is where we are suppose to be and we need to learn from it. This past month has been very stressful but it has also been rewarding. We have been able to get our inspections and repairs done for next year’s harvest, so in a way we are ahead of schedule! We have been able to spend more time with family. We don’t normally get to do the summer things ‘normal people’ get to do. Go to the lake or be able to go to adoration at church in the middle of the week, because our schedule allows it now. Our work is not as time sensitive like it is while harvesting. The other day I got to take a day and spend it with my goddaughter Martha. I needed that day with her. She reminded me that its OK to forget your problems for a day and just enjoy each others company. We took a drive around town, went to the lake and dipped our feet in, went to a 3D movie and finished up making spaghetti together for supper. Sounds pretty ordinary, but rather, it was extraordinary. I would not have normally done that if we had not been home.
Elk city repairs and fun
Emma:elk city food and fun
Elk city repairs and fun
Elk city repairs and fun

My sister and I have tried to start a business of our own, Simply Sentimental, making things out of reclaimed barn wood. The other day we made a cribbage board. No ordinary cribbage board let me tell you! It took about 10-15 hours to make from start to finish, but it was worth the smile on my brother-in-laws face. Plus it was a good time with my three siblings (Dan, Liz, and Katie) in making the table itself. I think he liked his birthday present!
Elk city repairs and fun
Emma:elk city cribbage board
Elk city repairs and fun
Elk city repairs and fun
Emma:elk city cribbage board

This past month has been stressful but I have to remember that all of these things are a blessing in disguise, and it is all in the way that I look at it. We will continue to do our best and trust that God will do the rest.

Be safe and God bless!

All Aboard Wheat Harvest is sponsored by High Plains Journal and New Holland Agriculture. Emma can be reached at emma@allaboardharvest.com.

Hooked on Garrison
Laura Haffner

Garrison, North Dakota: It is true. I’m hooked on Garrison, just like their motto states.

HPH-2016-North Dakota (Ryan)
Garrison, North Dakota’s slogan. (Photo by Ryan)

I recently told Ryan, “I think I could live up here. Maybe we should move here!”  It seems I may say that about all our stops, but that’s a good thing, right?!?! Ryan, normally the “glass half full” person of our relationship put a little water on my idea when he reminded me, “Yeah, but what about the winter?” He knows I’m not really a winter person and for me, it’s the necessary evil to get back to spring, summer, and fall! Problem solved, this can be my summer home! Oh wait, I guess as long as we harvest up here, it can be for a few weeks anyway!

So, what are some of the non harvest things I’m loving about this area? For one, it is so green and its August! I’m sure this area experiences its share of droughts, but for now I’ll just pretend it’s always so lush. It’s an outdoorsy person’s dream with the river, wetlands, lake, miles of trails and shoreline. It also meets my personal continuing education requirements with lots of historical or nature sites. The town is quite nice too with its downtown full of businesses, churches, and a clean park. You may have noticed the recurring theme of how this mama appreciates a nice park while away from her own yard/neighborhood!

Below are some highlights of our area experiences.

HPH-2016-North Dakota (Laura)
The North Dakota National Audubon Wildlife Refuge. We enjoyed the information center, trails, and driving tour.

HPH-2016-North Dakota (Laura)
Little Man receiving a tutorial on binoculars from Ranger Jackie. Children visiting the refuge can check out a “Let’s Go Outside” backpacks supplied with equipment to help them explore the natural world.

HPH-2016-North Dakota (Laura)
In my travels north I have noticed lots of little wetlands in fields and pastures. I learned at the refuge that parts of the Dakotas are in the “Prairie Pothole Region”. The potholes were left from the last glacier period and are crucial habitat for many waterfowl. The birds were lovely to watch and I was excited to capture this duck leaving the water.

HPH-2016-North Dakota (Laura)
We paid a visit to the Garrison Dam Fish Hatchery. They offered a great hands on tour, and we learned about the activities that go on at the facility. Pictured is Little Man learning about the Rainbow Trout.

HPH-2016-North Dakota (Laura)
We were able to view large pallid sturgeon, an endangered prehistoric fish species, in their holding tanks. The damming of the Missouri River has taken away natural breeding ground and an intensive breeding program takes place at the hatchery to keep the species viable.

HPH-2016-North Dakota (Laura)
Who knew that fish can feed themselves? The trout would knock the wire hanging in the water and that would release food into the tanks!

HPH-2016-North Dakota (Laura)
Although the scenery has probably changed with the dam system, it was still neat to be around the area that Lewis, Clark and team traveled. Pictured here is the Missouri River off the trail at the hatchery.

HPH-2016-North Dakota (Laura)
It is a pretty bold statement to declare a salad bar the “ultimate”, but in this case it is true! Ye Olde Malt Shoppe in downtown Garrison, has the best salad bar I’ve had on the harvest run. Hands down!

HPH-2016-North Dakota (Laura)
Garrison is home to Wally the Walleye, at the end of their main street.
  
HPH-2016-North Dakota (Laura)
What’s more fun than unstructured play time outside? Fort Stevenson State Park was a great place to go and get away from the camper and get some fresh air!
HPH-2016-North Dakota (Laura)
A sweet daddy daughter moment captured at sunset after family time on the trail.

All Aboard Wheat Harvest™ is sponsored by High Plains Journal and New Holland Agriculture. You can contact Laura at laura@allaboardharvest.com.

Perspective
Emma Misener

Elk City, Ok — I mentioned in my last post that we have been washing the equipment and doing some preventative maintenance. Well, because it has been so hot lately, playing outside is just too hot to handle for all of the kids around here. So what better way to get them out of the house and out of your hair than to get wet?! Plus they are all good help so the job was not only more fun, but it also went faster with their help. At first they were all complaining because they didn’t want to work and wash. It is amazing how quickly their perspective can change. Its all in the matter of how you present the task at hand. How about we put on our swimming suits and run through the water?! It’s like our own little water park for free! They could not get ready fast enough. 🙂 All the kids were great help, and it was nice to have a good laugh.
Emma:elk city and washing
Emma:elk city and washing
Emma:elk city and washing
Emma:elk city and washing
Emma:elk city and washing
Emma:elk city and washing

Be safe and God bless!

All Aboard Wheat Harvest is sponsored by High Plains Journal and New Holland Agriculture. Emma can be reached at emma@allaboardharvest.com.

Got the Itch
Steph Osowski

Grafton, ND – Something I was sure you were all wondering is, “when is Steph going to get her camera fixed?” Well, wonder no longer. My camera has been fixed and is back running better than ever. The next problem is now on me to remember to bring it with me. I’m too used to it being broken. That being said, this post still includes photos taken form my phone because I, of course, forgot to bring my camera to the field. 

Harvest is going to be on a very interesting timeline this season. With all the rain, the fields are an assortment of mud-holes and puddles of various shapes and sizes for the combines to maneuver around. The wheat on our harvest docket is still turning but we have slowly been able to start barley in the last week. Barley is all fun and games until the end of the day when you want to itch the skin off of your skeleton. We harvest for three farmers that work together (Farmer Randy, Farmer Wayne and Farmer Lee) and all the jokes and sarcasm that is shared over the radio would make anyone’s day.

To top it all off, we got some MORE rain and the weatherman says we will be receiving even more this evening. The ground is rejecting moisture of any kind at this stage so all we can do is pray for a wind and wait it out. And, you know, maybe get some fishing done in the meantime. We’ve had all sorts of time to get every piece of equipment washed and fix anything that might need fixing and even some things that didn’t need to be fixed but we fixed anyway, just because we had the time.
Barley.
Barley.
View from the grain cart.
View from the grain cart.
Stuck.
Stuck.
Real stuck.
Real stuck.
Right to the frame.
Right to the frame.
Peter and Farmer Lee checking out the damage.
Peter and Farmer Lee checking out the damage.
Where's the wheel?!
Where’s the wheel?!
Don :)
Don, Farmer Wayne’s dad.
Farmer Randy and Peter joking around.
Farmer Randy and Peter joking around.
Farmer Wayne trying out a stripper head.
Farmer Wayne trying out a stripper head.
Barley is itchy but at least it's pretty.
Barley is itchy but at least it’s pretty.
Unloading into Purple.
Unloading into Purple.
Farmer Lee.
Farmer Lee looking on as the grain cart unloads.

All Aboard Wheat Harvest™ is sponsored by High Plains Journal and New Holland Agriculture. You can contact Steph at stephanie@allaboardharvest.com.

A Working Vacation
Z Crew

Matheson, Colorado – 
We finally made a decision and there’s no turning back now.

Weather began playing against the “plan” we had. The plan was immediately after we finished the wheat in Colorado, we were going to make our way to the San Luis Valley for the barley harvest. Then the monsoons moved in. The plan started taking a different course of action. The swathing dates for the barley kept getting pushed later, which meant picking it up got later. The question going through Jim’s mind has been “Do we gamble with the weather and head over the pass and count on a short run? Or, do we play it safe and stay where we’re at?” The reason he was starting to second guess what we should do is we’re planning on helping with the proso millet again this year. Right now (and we all know plans can change), a date has been set to “possibly” begin picking up proso September 1. That doesn’t leave much time for us to make the trip to the valley (three times) and back (three times).

When I was finally given the chance to give him my opinion, I told him I thought we should just gamble and head over the pass. We’re here…we have a combine…we’re supposed to be using that combine…and we’re usually in one place for ten days to two weeks before moving. So, we made our first trip yesterday afternoon with Frank and Pete (our trucks). I had no idea what to expect.
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The countryside from the farm to LaVeta is desert. It was HOT and the air was dry. My eyes and nose literally had every bit of moisture sucked right out.
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And then I started seeing them on the horizon…the mountains. I get as much pleasure seeing mountains as I do a field of wheat! And tend to take about as many pictures to verify this!
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Yes, we did get rained on but with the heat, it didn’t stay wet very long.
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The perfectly shaped mountain. I couldn’t help but think about the many pictures that have been drawn by my kids which included mountains that looked exactly like this one. I now know the mountain they used to draw does exist.
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The LaVeta pass is an eight-mile climb. When you finally get up and over the pass, the next town to stop in is Ft. Garland. And…yes…the route we took to our destination is marked on the map as a “Scenic Route”.
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This mountain range is one of several that can be seen from the place we parked Frank and dropped the grain trailer. We will be helping Ryan and Casey while in the valley and this is what they get to look at every. single. day. (jealous) Yes, this is going to be like a working vacation!


As I mentioned, we dropped the grain trailer and parked Frank and left again in the Pete. By now, it was 8:30 pm and we needed something to eat. We walked into a restaurant at 8:50 – they close at 9:00. “Can we still get something to eat?” “Absolutely” was their reply. Once we had a quick bite, we made our way a bit further down the road. We pulled into an empty lot, parked and slept in the “Hotel Pete.” This is what we woke up to in Blanca, Colorado:

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And the next several pictures are of the view on the way down the other side of the pass (forgive the dirty windows). 

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We returned to the Cottage about 2:00 p.m. Wednesday. We waited for the heat of the day to disappear and then washed the Beast for the first time this summer. It was so dirty. She’s loaded and ready to make the trip over the pass Thursday morning. Plans are to leave shortly after sunrise…THAT’S 6:00 AM! I’ll be the first one to tell you I am NOT a morning person! They’re predicting another hot day for eastern Colorado and Jim wants to make it up and over the pass before that heat kicks in. 

Once we get this trip made, we’ll have to make another trip to Goodland, Kansas to get our MacDon pick-up head. So, that means all that will remain to make the trip will be the header and the trailer house.  I look forward to this new adventure. I just can’t imagine waking up every day and getting to work in such beautiful surroundings! What a job we have!

All Aboard Wheat Harvest™ is sponsored by High Plains Journal and New Holland Agriculture. The Z Crew can be reached at zcrew@allaboardharvest.com.

Update from Montana
Laura Haffner

Cut Bank, Montana: Upon visiting with Mark this morning, I learned he and the crew have completed about a quarter of the job in Montana. He feels fortunate to have been able to make some progress as they’ve been fighting wet wheat. They received rain yesterday night so that has put a stop to things again. The crew is catching up on laundry and contemplating another visit to Glacier National Park.   Prior to the current stand still, the wheat was yielding 70-80 bushels per acre where the crops hadn’t received hail.

Below are some photos Mark captured of the Montana wheat harvest. Aren’t those large, rolling fields beautiful?

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HPH-2016-Montana (Mark)
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HPH-2016-Montana (Mark)
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HPH-2016-Montana (Mark)
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HPH-2016-Montana (Mark)
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HPH-2016-Montana (Mark)
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HPH-2016-Montana (Mark)
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HPH-2016-Montana (Mark)
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HPH-2016-Montana (Mark)
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All Aboard Wheat Harvest™ is sponsored by High Plains Journal and New Holland Agriculture. You can contact Laura at laura@allaboardharvest.com.