High Plains Journal All Aboard Wheat Harvest
All Aboard Wheat Harvest Combine Cam

Tag Archives: All Aboard

We’re home… Now what?
Steph Osowski

Grafton, ND – The two worst turns of the entire harvest are the two that lead us back to the homestead. I can say, however, that we all made it back into the yard without tipping any equipment into the ditch.

Harvest is still about ten days off around home. Even though half the crew is heading to western ND to knock some wheat out, we still have about a week or more of downtime. What’s a harvest crew to do? Well, all the things we thought about doing but didn’t have time to do on the harvest trail such as; washing combines, washing headers, re-sickling headers and washing trucks/hopper bottom. Basically, we are making our entire fleet look pretty again.

When you want input on your product, what do you do? Send a representative out to the people that use it, that’s what! Mr. Igor Kuzmenko from New Holland, PA paid us a visit in our very hometown this afternoon. He asked us questions about the combines and what we thought could be improved and how New Holland could greater serve us in the future. We really enjoyed and, most of all, appreciated the visit!

Quote of the Day“And that was without a single drop of coffee.”

An Osowski Original – This original is a flashback from only one year ago on our trip back home. About 45-minutes from home, we hit some road construction that was so soft and narrow that we had to unload the combine right in the middle of the construction site to get the truck/trailer combination out of the hole we found ourselves in. We were asked by one of the construction interns, “Didn’t you check the website?” Of course I am perusing the Internet while pulling combine down the road… Not. And for the record, it wasn’t on the website nor were there signs until you were too far-gone. Oh, the memories.

On the border!
Made it back to the homeland!
Stopped in the cute little town of Kulm for lunch.
Stopped in the cute little town of Kulm, ND for lunch on our drive home.
Beautiful ND countryside.
Beautiful ND countryside.
The wheat is still a little green up here!
The wheat is still a little green up here at home and the Mother Nature-made ditch is proof of all the rain we received. Since May 27, the Grafton area has received 27 inches of rain.
Visited my daycare kiddos!
Visited my daycare kiddos!
Sunset on our first night home.
Sunset on our first night home.
Osowski Ag with Igor.
Osowski Ag Service posing with Igor.
Washing combines.
Washing combines.

North Bound
Laura Haffner

It’s hard to believe that Colorado is complete. We were still cutting there this time last year. The crews were fortunate to have excellent weather since the 4th and 5th of July respectively and cut daily until the 22nd when they completed Colorado. We had some rains move through, but they were spotty enough that we were able to move to other fields to cut, or just experienced a delay until the late morning or afternoon. The excellent wheat was just so much fun to cut, and farmers in good spirits (if you don’t think about grain prices)!   

The kids and I really enjoy the Brush stop. Everything we need, minus church and the grocery store, is easily accessible on foot which is awesome for exercise and avoiding additional car/car seat time! People get used to seeing us around town on our way to the library or other places. As I stated last year, they have a WONDERFUL library and children’s program and we just love attending. They have several beautiful parks as well.  But even with such positive things, it’s the time of season, where the rat race catches up and the walls of the camper start closing in. If I’m honest, despite the adventure and knowledge the kids are gaining some positive things from the experience, it can be difficult at times to be on the road with two little ones.

As a result, I had a down day last week.  I feel guilty feeling that way when there’s such much to be thankful for, but we all have down days from time to time and try to remember its part of life.  It’s amazing how things can sometimes work out when you need a little encouragement. On this day in particular, I received a surprise email from a church friend letting us know they missed us and hoped we were doing well.  I received a text from another friend. Then our farmer’s wife called and invited us over to spend the day at their house. Oh, what a treat that was to be able to have space to spread out and play and be able to run around in a real yard!  Adult conversation and fellowship was a special treat as well in addition to lunch. It was just the pick me up I needed to put my harvest game face back on and get back in the game. The kids were re energized too after visiting and we greatly appreciated their hospitality. I know those were three blessings from Above. 

That night Ryan told me that with the hot weather and dry conditions the end had snuck up much faster than expected. They would be finished the next day if everything went as planned. Saturday was spent preparing equipment for the last part of our wheat harvest run and our longest hauls yet. The crew with Mark headed to Montana on Sunday. The kids and I headed for an unexpected, quick trip home since the moving and packing process is such a crazy time and it would allow me to catch up with the mail that finally caught up to us in Brush.  We were also able to catch up with the kids’ grandparents which was a huge blessing. Ryan made a flying trip home as did some of the crew to drop off and exchange some equipment. We will need draper headers for North Dakota. On Monday, Ryan tied up some lose ends locally, picked up parts and headed back to Colorado. They made it as far as Rapid City, South Dakota, Tuesday night. The kidlets and I will head out later this week. The thought of the 11+ hour trip (that’s not including stops) is enough to make this mama feel a little sick to her stomach, but I’m going to try to maybe sneak some fun things into the trip to break it up a little. I didn’t travel to this stop last year since I was expecting Lady A, so it will be something new for the kids and I. It’s the last push of the wheat harvest marathon and time to kick it in for the home stretch! It’s hard to believe we’ll be starting wet corn next month!!! 



HPH-2016-Preparing for Montana & North Dakota
Equipment getting a bit of a breather! (Photo credit: Ryan)

HPH-2016-Preparing for Montana & North Dakota
Loading the combine. (Photo credit: Ryan)

HPH-2016-Preparing for Montana & North Dakota
One of our farmers kindly let us use their facilities to do some equipment maintenance before making the long journey north. (Photo credit: Ryan)

HPH-2016-Preparing for Montana & North Dakota
The trucks needed an oil change before leaving. (Photo credit: Ryan)

HPH-2016-Preparing for Montana & North Dakota
The Shelbournes are packed and ready to roll! (Photo credit: Ryan)

HPH-2016-Montana Bound (Mark)
These tires weren’t team players on the way to Montana! (Photo Credit: Mark)

HPH-2016-Montana Bound (Mark)
Here is some of the caravan heading to Montana. (Photo Credit: Mark)

HPH-2016-North Dakota Bound (Ryan)
HPH taking up the diesel bays in Rapid City, South Dakota, makes for a fun, but very expensive photo op!


All Aboard Wheat Harvest™ is sponsored by High Plains Journal and New Holland Agriculture. You can contact Laura at laura@allaboardharvest.com.

Family, Tradition and Memories
Z Crew

Matheson, Colorado –
They showed up at the field shortly after noon on Thursday and left again shortly before noon on Sunday. The anticipation of having them here with us was almost more than I could stand. And then, just like the other visits, it was over. And…just like the other visits, this mama’s heart was heavy. The whole time they were with us we were in the field. The day they left, it rained late in the afternoon – just figures!

Both Eli and Nora loved hanging out at the field with us while they could. Had we been on our own, they may have stayed a little longer. As it was, because we are helping Ryan and Casey, we have a grain cart. Having a grain cart makes it much more difficult to get back to the trucks. Unless we could time it a bit more perfectly, the combine would be on the other end of the field when the kids had had enough. Eli spent the entire afternoon with me the first day – even found the ledge behind the seat made for a perfect napping place (I remember crawling up on the ledge of the old Massey’s and taking a nap while riding with my Grandpa). I’m certain my Grandpa and Grandma were looking down from Heaven with smiles on their faces. When Nora came with Jamie and Callie, I even let her sit on my lap and do a little cutting. It wasn’t straight, but who cares?! She was loving it and that’s all that mattered. 

On Saturday afternoon when they showed up, the combine was nowhere close to the trucks, so they opted to hang out with Jim in the truck. The kids all piled in the sleeper and rode to the grain bins with him. The little ones even got to experience a nap in the sleeper…just like their mama used to do. 

That’s what it’s all about, right? Family, tradition and memories. The years go by so very quickly! Having the grandkids in the field with us just verified that. Three generations in the cab of a combine or truck…can’t get much better than that!
Z Crew: Because it's what harvesters do.
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Z Crew: Because it's what harvesters do.
Sharing my chips with my little buddy. Speaking of buddy…when the ride was over, Eli climbed up in my lap, hugged me and told me I was HIS BEST BUDDY. Made my heart just hurt with love!
Z Crew: Because it's what harvesters do.
Eli was in 7th Heaven getting to play with Wes’ combine and tractor on the farm.
Z Crew: Because it's what harvesters do.
The Beast has friends to play with here.
Z Crew: Because it's what harvesters do.
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Z Crew: Because it's what harvesters do.
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Z Crew: Because it's what harvesters do.
Three generations in the same cab of a combine.
Z Crew: Because it's what harvesters do.
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Z Crew: Because it's what harvesters do.
A HarvestHER in the making!
Z Crew: Because it's what harvesters do.
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Z Crew: Because it's what harvesters do.
Leaving the field for the day.
Z Crew: Because it's what harvesters do.
Callie and Nora playing outside the trailer house (in the farmer’s yard).
Z Crew: Because it's what harvesters do.
One last picture before we head to the field and they head home.
Z Crew: Because it's what harvesters do.
Storm clouds beginning to roll in late afternoon – every. single. day! (Pikes Peak on the horizon)
Z Crew: Because it's what harvesters do.
The day the kids left, this angry looking storm left rain as it marched east. Why couldn’t this have happened while they were here?
Z Crew: Because it's what harvesters do.
The road was muddy and we needed to get the service truck out of the field. Jim decided to drive it through the stubble of the field we had finished earlier in the day.
Z Crew: Because it's what harvesters do.
Made it!

All Aboard Wheat Harvest™ is sponsored by High Plains Journal and New Holland Agriculture. The Z Crew can be reached at zcrew@allaboardharvest.com.

Vices
Steph Osowski

Selby, ND – Osowski Ag Service is now homeward bound. I was recently sent a text that said, “Holy smokes! Have you guys ever been home this early?!” My response? Probably in a time far, far away, but none that I can recall. It is a safe bet that we will be home the first week in August or later, rarely earlier. Grafton can now be better known as the true land of 10,000 lakes given all the rain they continue to receive so I’m guessing by the outskirts of town, we will be swimming the duration of the way.

We’ve all got our thing we use to stay awake or at this point in the season, get slight withdrawals from if we don’t have said thing at our disposal. We’ve all got our vices. Mom’s, for instance, is Mountain Dew. She prefers it from a fountain but will accept cans or bottles. Dad has to have a thermos full of coffee. Peter can normally be seen holding a Red Bull with a side of Skittles, but Coca-Cola will work in the absence of Red Bull. Brandon has to have dill pickle sunflower seeds with a Coke. Last but not least, I am a big fan of Monster Rehab energy drinks (preferably the pink lemonade flavor). Traveling days call for multiples of all of the above.

The wheat we did while in Hemingford, Neb. did about 30 bushel for an average. The protein scrambled around from 7-10 in content. Around home, we are looking at 2-3 weeks before we start combining wheat but the barley could be ready within the week. The headers may need floaties, but we will do what we can!

(6 stops, 2 combines and…)
Bread Count – 6,549,191.88 loaves

Quote of the Day“Me and rattlesnakes are on a seek and destroy mission.”

Heading down into Farmer Steve's crater field.
Heading down into Farmer Steve’s crater field.
Waiting for a load.
Waiting for a load.
Pretty moon.
Pretty moon.
Cleaning off combines.
Cleaning off combines.
Gorgeous sunset.
Gorgeous sunset.
"Where the battle wasn't."
“Where the battle wasn’t…” One of the best town signs along the trail!

Sharing isn’t caring!
Laura Haffner

Northeast Colorado:You may have heard your kindergarten teacher say, “Sharing is caring!” However, that rule doesn’t always apply to harvest. One of the most hated tasks of the crew is blowing off the machines, but it is a crucial practice not only for keeping machines running smoothly, but for good stewardship of leaving pests where we found them. The crew blows off machines before switching to a new farmer. However, if the farmer is fighting weed pest within his/her own operation, we can blow machines off before switching fields too. 

Below are some photos Mark sent in of the crew finishing the clean up process after their July 11-17, stay in the Sterling, Stoneham, and Logan Corners area. He was glad to be back for another year. The area’s yields averaged in the 50’s where hail had not been present.  Also pictured is a new crew member in training!

HPH-2016-Stoneham, CO (Mark)
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HPH-2016-Stoneham, CO (Mark)
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HPH-2016-Stoneham, CO (Mark)
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HPH-2016-Stoneham, CO (Mark)
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HPH-2016-Colorado (Mark)
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All Aboard Wheat Harvest™ is sponsored by High Plains Journal and New Holland Agriculture. You can contact Laura at laura@allaboardharvest.com.

Harvest Party
Laura Haffner

Southeastern Morgan County, Colorado: The crew was temporarily reunited Monday in southeastern Morgan County, Colorado. It was the type of day harvest dreams are made of. There was plenty of heat, a breeze, and a beautiful big blue Colorado sky for a backdrop. There was also the pressure to get as much wheat out as possible in hopes to finish up the current farmer before the predicted storms set in.

Five combines were going round and round in the field doing their harvest dance, while the grain carts looked like worker bees going from combine to combine to collect the grain. Just as soon as a truck arrived at the field it was sent back to the elevator. The wheat was excellent. It was a harvest party, and the much anticipated guests of honor were the trucks. We turned our eyes to the western horizon hoping to see a growing dust cloud which meant a returning truck. With the amazing conditions, we had all of our trucks on the scene and they were going all out to keep up.

Our farmer gave his crop a good future throughout the growing season with fertilizer, weed control and fungicide. He is a dryland farmer, so he’s at the complete mercy of precipitation. The other day, I realized I haven’t given my readers a baseline when I tell you this may be the crop of a life time. I asked him what he would hope for as far as an average crop. He replied that if it made forty bushels per acre he would be very happy. He’s currently blowing his wishes out of the water. We’ve been cutting 60-80 bushel wheat with much of it in the 70ish bushel range. That is about a thirty bushels average over what they hope to make in a decent year! Amazing!!! The only damper to the situation is grain prices. They are very low, and last I checked, grain products at the supermarket have not followed this trend down. What can you do? For now, everyone is trying to keep their head up and be thankful for such an abundant harvest.

As luck would have it, the storms just couldn’t wait and a combine with a terrible sense of humor had an untimely breakdown which left about forty acres in the field. Ryan was discouraged with how it timed out, but they were to go back and finish a couple days later. All machines are running and have moved to the next farm of this stop.

Below are some photos I captured of the crew working together on Monday.

HPH-2016-Brush Monday (Laura)-9
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HPH-2016-Brush Monday (Laura)-5
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HPH-2016-Brush Monday (Laura)-6
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HPH-2016-Brush Monday (Laura)-8
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HPH-2016-Brush Monday (Laura)-7
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HPH-2016-Brush Monday (Laura)-3
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HPH-2016-Brush Monday (Laura)-4
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HPH-2016-Brush Monday (Laura)-2
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HPH-2016-Brush Monday (Laura)
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All Aboard Wheat Harvest™ is sponsored by High Plains Journal and New Holland Agriculture. You can contact Laura at laura@allaboardharvest.com.

Terraces
Emma Misener

Sweetwater, OK — I texted a friend one day with this picture and a caption: “terraces.” He replied, “suck!” 
Emma: Sweetwater terraces
They may not look like much because pictures never do it justice, but they were steep.

Terraces CAN suck. Especially ones like these that are so steep. These are not the steepest terraces I have ever cut on, but I thought they were definitely worthy of their own post. For those of you who don’t really know much about them, they are actually very helpful. They help distribute the water more evenly to the whole field rather than those pesky low spots you can have that collect water. That is basically the job of a terrace. I am not really sure why we don’t see these terraces much north of Nebraska, but I guess that’s the way it is. We cut the terraces out. Meaning, we follow the lay of them following every curve, then cut the wheat that is in between each one and work our way across the field. We do this because we believe we leave too much wheat behind if we strictly just cut up and over them. Some people do it this way, but we prefer to have a field look as best as possible and that means no wheat left in the field.

Be safe and God bless!

All Aboard Wheat Harvest™ is sponsored by High Plains Journal and New Holland Agriculture. Emma can be reached at emma@allaboardharvest.com

Still Waiting to Get Into That Routine
Z Crew

Z Crew: Because it's what harvesters do!
One of our last Kansas sunsets.
Z Crew: Because it's what harvesters do.
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Deerfield, Kansas –
The above picture is the final night of cutting near Deerfield, Kansas. What we had left in that field would be finished the next day. With all the rain in the area, there was a small pond in a corner of that field. And, it would be best to have Jim cut it out. If anyone was going to get the Beast stuck, it would be best if it was him! 

It didn’t take long to finish the field and then what was ahead of us was the worst part of the job…clean up. It was HOT – like 100 degree hot. And wind? Nope. None. We started cleaning on the header first – the dirtiest of the two. We both tried finding reasons to sit in the shade so when the crop duster flew right over the top of us, it was reason enough to stop and enjoy our own personal air show. Crop duster pilots have my utmost respect! I honestly believe they are part daredevil, part crazy! How they maneuver their planes without crashing is an amazing feat! 
Z Crew: Because it's what harvesters do.
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Z Crew: Because it's what harvesters do.
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Z Crew: Because it's what harvesters do.
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When we finished the header, we quit for the night. The combine would have to be done the next day.

We woke up to a fairly brisk wind and it was cool. Well, cool for the SW Kansas desert. Although, with all the rain the area had, it wasn’t much of a desert this year. The corn shot up from being a foot high when we arrived to over six and tasseled literally overnight. It didn’t stay suitable for humans very long. The wind died and it got very hot again. But, the job had to be completed. So, we would work for a while and then find a reason to go into Garden City. I think we must have made a half dozen trips to Garden City just to be able to sit in the air conditioned cab of the pickup. 
Z Crew: Because it's what harvesters do.
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Cleaning combine in the heat of the day was about as painful as childbirth. Even Jim was sweating…and he never sweats. It didn’t get fit to do anything until the sun began to set. We loaded the combine just as the sun was setting and the rest was done after dark. We finally finished about 10 pm – when it was actually fit to do anything!

We took the trailer house and Frank (with the header) to the farm near Limon, CO the next day. The trip was uneventful – which was a good thing! When we arrived, we set up the house-on-wheels and found the farmers we had cut for the past several years. They were busy cutting wheat so we hung around the field until they quit fo supper so we could say hello. It was really good to see all of them again!!
Z Crew: Because it's what harvesters do.
The storms were rolling in as we arrived in Colorado – guess we brought the rain with us. It seems like we’re good at that!
Z Crew: Because it's what harvesters do.
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Z Crew: Because it's what harvesters do.
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We left after we had a piece of pizza with them and headed back towards Kansas. We didn’t make it all the way. We ended up spending the night in Scott City. So, we didn’t have much farther to go the next morning. Once we arrived at the farm, we settled up with our farmer, loaded the pickup on the car trailer and headed north again.
Z Crew: Because it's what harvesters do.
There are a lot of these piles scattered all over the Midwest! A bumper crop with no place to take it.
 
When we got to our destination we started unloading everything, of course. It was then that we realized we had a problem with one of the front combine tires…a bulge. Jim immediately got on the phone and started making plans for what we were going to have to do to get a new one. Apparently, this particular tire is not one that would be easily found. The new one was going to be shipped from North Carolina, which would take several days. We had to have a tire NOW. The plan was to take the car trailer to Gothenburg the next day and load up a used tire that could fill the gap until the new one arrived. Jim thought the trip was a little more than 200 miles. I’m not sure where the additional 100 miles came from but the one-way trip was over 300 miles. We arrived in Gothenburg, loaded the tire and headed right back towards Colorado. 
Z Crew: Because it's what harvesters do.
McDonald’s double cheeseburger meal was a must as we were driving through Burlington, CO at 10:30 pm.
Z Crew: Because it's what harvesters do.
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This puts us at Sunday (7/17). One of Jim’s very favorite places to visit in Limon is the Witt Boys’ NAPA store. They have always treated us so good – more of those “going above and beyond” kind of people. Whenever Jim talks about them, it’s always with pride in his voice. And…they lived up to that respect yet again. Sunday morning arrives and Witt Boys’ employees are at the farm putting a new tire on the Beast. Most people don’t understand the urgency of getting combines back in the field during harvest but these guys do! Thank you for your help with our situation! We couldn’t have done it without you.
Z Crew: Because it's what harvesters do.
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So, with the used tire mounted, we were ready to roll again. Like the yellow rim? Interesting how many people saw that and commented on it rather than the awesome cloud! That silly cloud dropped some of the biggest drops I have ever seen – and caused us to have to park the Beast. We’re helping fellow harvesters, Ryan and Casey Graham, here in the Limon area. Once we get all the machines back together again, we’ll have four yellow combines in the same field.

 Another much larger cloud made its way over to us before we could get back in the field again. This time it rained enough to shut us down all day Monday. Another day to catch up on things – but that didn’t happen. Instead of going to get groceries and doing laundry, I ended up getting a haircut. I guess that was okay, too!
Z Crew: Because it's what harvesters do.
This storm ended up dumping over 1/2 inch of rain at our field and nearly 2 inches where the trailer house is sitting. Needless to say there was a lot of water in the fields.
Z Crew: Because it's what harvesters do.
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We got started cutting again Tuesday at noon. The wheat is absolutely beautiful! It’s another once in a lifetime crop for the farmers in this area. The yield monitor has been holding steady at 72 bushels per acre – sometimes a bit more and sometimes a bit less. It’s standing and it cuts fairly fast. I can now go 4.5 to 5 mph. This is so much more enjoyable than the 1.8 mph that I had been going in Kansas with the lodged wheat. You’d be amazed how that wears on a person! The BIG problem we and the other farmers in the area have is storage. The elevators are already full and they’re not sure what they’re going to do to handle the situation. It could get VERY interesting before this is over.

We had a good afternoon and then the clouds started rolling in again. The weatherman was calling for storms with a lot of rain. We got a few drops just as we were stopping for the night. One thing about Harvest 2016…we haven’t had many full days. I’m certain not all harvesters have been in this predicament but it sure seems to be the story for the Z Crew. There’s nothing worse than getting geared up to go and then coming to a screeching halt. Once the routine of being in the field is broken, it’s so ridiculously hard to get back into it again. We’re still waiting to get into that routine. UGH!!
Z Crew: Because it's what harvesters do.
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Z Crew: Because it's what harvesters do.
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All Aboard Wheat Harvest™ is sponsored by High Plains Journal and New Holland Agriculture. The Z Crew can be reached at zcrew@allaboardharvest.com.

Photographs Speak Louder than Words
Laura Haffner

Southeastern Morgan County, Colorado: Last year was the first time we cut for the farmers at our current location. In that time, we learned we had some common interests and that we really enjoy the view through our cameras’ viewfinders! It’s been fun to return this year to harvest and catch up on the happenings of the last twelve months and “play cameras!” They were gracious enough to share their photos with us and agreed to allow me to share some with you as well. I’m not sure if any further description is needed since the photos speak for themselves. I selected an assortment so you could see what the crew has been up to during the last week.

I was told to give the photo credits to Lynn and her faithful four-legged assistant, Jake, but there may have been another contributor as well!

HPH-2016-Morgan County, Colorado
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HPH-2016-Morgan County, Colorado
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HPH-2016-Morgan County, Colorado
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HPH-2016-Morgan County, Colorado
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HPH-2016-Morgan County, Colorado
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HPH-2016-Morgan County, Colorado
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HPH-2016-Morgan County, Colorado
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HPH-2016-Morgan County, Colorado
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HPH-2016-Morgan County, Colorado
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HPH-2016-Morgan County, Colorado
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HPH-2016-Morgan County, Colorado
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HPH-2016-Morgan County, Colorado
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HPH-2016-Morgan County, Colorado
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All Aboard Wheat Harvest™ is sponsored by High Plains Journal and New Holland Agriculture. You can contact Laura at laura@allaboardharvest.com.

Passion
Emma Misener

Sweetwater, OK — As I have mentioned in previous posts we have had lots of riders in the field. The kids are all so different. Some come to ride for a few minutes before wanting to go home, others maybe a couple hours, and still others some cannot get enough. My nephew, Leslie, is one that cannot get enough, as well as my niece, Lauren, who seems to want to do nothing else! All the kids like coming to the field, but these two really have a passion for it! It is refreshing to see the same determination and drive you find in yourself, in others. Especially those of which are so young.

Lauren needs her own post! This little girl, or rather young lady of almost double-digit 10 is so much fun in the field. She is willing to do the ‘dumb’ jobs or the jobs that aren’t so much fun. Sure, she wants to do the grown up jobs, but is willing to be patient and wait for when the time is right. The other day we were a person short it seemed. The grain cart was on the other side of the field, causing the combine to have to drive clear across it to dump. This is silly. She climbed happily up into the tractor cab, was given a brief and thorough lesson in moving and stopping, safety and common sense, and before long she was off in the cart moving it in a timely fashion. She is amazing! She did so good and did everything exactly as instructed. I was so impressed that i felt she was ready to unload on-the-go! She did a fabulous job! There is always room for improvement, but that is how you learn. She did just as good as any hired man first day on the job. Good job, Lauren! You’re hired!
Emma:elk city and beyond
Emma:elk city and beyond
Emma:elk city and beyond


Be safe and God bless!

All Aboard Wheat Harvest™ is sponsored by High Plains Journal and New Holland Agriculture. Emma can be reached at emma@allaboardharvest.com