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Rain in the middle of harvest isn't typically a word you like to hear, but for this Okie—it is heaven.

Last week meteorologists were predicting a 10 to 60 percent chance of rain, and no two weather stations predicted the same forecast. Keeping an eye on the weather was not our priority, but the rain obviously came.

Big storm rollin' in

Dusk before the Storm

Last pass before the rain
This was the last round we had to take to finish the field, and it was just in time!

Wheat harvest for Misener Family Harvesters has officially started and it sure didn't take long to get back into the swing of things.

Yesterday we drove three combines, tractor and grain cart, and two semis to our first stop on the 2012 trail. We started south of Elk City, Okla., and cut around 160 acres. Not too bad for our first day. The wheat averaged about 11 percent moisture, 61 pound test weight, and around 30 to 35 bushels per acre. Compared to last year, the wheat is considerably better, like night and day.

Our First Day!
Dan took this picture yesterday. The farmer is right behind us with the tractor working the field.

Harvest hasn't quite started for the Misener Family, so we're keeping busy with things around the shop. Some of the things we're doing is inspecting our combines, tightening chains and belts, doing some preventative maintenance by changing bearings that are nearly worn out, and cleaning cabs. Some might find this a little tedious, but this is the kind of work that keeps us running in the fields when harvest is in full bloom. No breakdowns in the fields means more wheat we can cut in a shorter amount of time. Not only do we appreciate this, but our customers appreciate it even more. It's nice to know your whole livelihood is gathered up and no longer sitting in the vulnerable field. 

The Miseners have been very busy since my last post in December and I have some catching up to do!

Nothing has really changed for us because we're still up and down the roads. After we made the long haul home after the 2011 fall harvest we took a well deserved vacation to Montana to spend the holidays with my grandparents. We also headed to Grand Island, Neb., for the U.S. Custom Harvesters Annual Convention. We had a chance to see and catch up with our fellow harvesters.

 It's that time of year again. Time to get the combines rolling and the crews to the field.

The crews will be sharing their experiences as their custom crews move from Texas on north throughout the summer months.

We encourage all of our fans to be as interactive as possible. Our correspondents love to see your feedback. Follow us on Twitter, “Like” us on Facebook, and catch our videos on YouTube. We also have a Flickr account where award-winning photos from years past are located and where new photos will be uploaded. While we anxiously await new sights of harvest enjoy a recap of some of the best photos of last harvest.

Seven months ago my family and I left Elk City, Okla. to start our 2011 harvest season. It seems as if we should still be prepping for the long trip north, but instead I find myself trying to summarize the 2011 harvest and it is more difficult than I expected. I could say it was the best year ever, or that it was the worst - but I won't say either.

This year was, shall I say, interesting. It was stuck in the middle.