All Aboard Harvest | Got the Itch
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Got the Itch

Got the Itch

Grafton, ND – Something I was sure you were all wondering is, “when is Steph going to get her camera fixed?” Well, wonder no longer. My camera has been fixed and is back running better than ever. The next problem is now on me to remember to bring it with me. I’m too used to it being broken. That being said, this post still includes photos taken form my phone because I, of course, forgot to bring my camera to the field. 

Harvest is going to be on a very interesting timeline this season. With all the rain, the fields are an assortment of mud-holes and puddles of various shapes and sizes for the combines to maneuver around. The wheat on our harvest docket is still turning but we have slowly been able to start barley in the last week. Barley is all fun and games until the end of the day when you want to itch the skin off of your skeleton. We harvest for three farmers that work together (Farmer Randy, Farmer Wayne and Farmer Lee) and all the jokes and sarcasm that is shared over the radio would make anyone’s day.

To top it all off, we got some MORE rain and the weatherman says we will be receiving even more this evening. The ground is rejecting moisture of any kind at this stage so all we can do is pray for a wind and wait it out. And, you know, maybe get some fishing done in the meantime. We’ve had all sorts of time to get every piece of equipment washed and fix anything that might need fixing and even some things that didn’t need to be fixed but we fixed anyway, just because we had the time.

Barley.

Barley.

View from the grain cart.

View from the grain cart.

Stuck.

Stuck.

Real stuck.

Real stuck.

Right to the frame.

Right to the frame.

Peter and Farmer Lee checking out the damage.

Peter and Farmer Lee checking out the damage.

Where's the wheel?!

Where’s the wheel?!

Don :)

Don, Farmer Wayne’s dad.

Farmer Randy and Peter joking around.

Farmer Randy and Peter joking around.

Farmer Wayne trying out a stripper head.

Farmer Wayne trying out a stripper head.

Barley is itchy but at least it's pretty.

Barley is itchy but at least it’s pretty.

Unloading into Purple.

Unloading into Purple.

Farmer Lee.

Farmer Lee looking on as the grain cart unloads.



All Aboard Wheat Harvest™ is sponsored by High Plains Journal and New Holland Agriculture. You can contact Steph at stephanie@allaboardharvest.com.

8 Comments
  • Tom Stegmeier
    Posted at 19:11h, 15 August

    I see it’s two row Barley is it Malt ? Rough awned ,puts the big I in itch, smooth awned Barley is not as bad ,As a teenager many moons ago on our farm I run a Massey Harris 90. no cab,now that’s scratchy !! You must be getting our left over soggy weather from South Western Alberta. Work Safe.

    • Steph Osowski
      Posted at 09:22h, 17 August

      Yes the barley is for malting, but we are being forced to wait out this wetness more than usual because we are leaving such big ruts in the fields. Those big duels and even rear-wheel assist don’t do enough to stop them. Thank you for the comment!

  • Charles Durham
    Posted at 10:14h, 16 August

    Nothing is worse then a stuck combine. There is NOT a good place to pull on a combine. You can do more damage pulling it — then all the harvesting it has done.

    • Steph Osowski
      Posted at 09:23h, 17 August

      You are right — stuck combines are horrible to deal with. We managed to get it out with a quad track tractor that belonged to a neighboring farmer. Thank goodness for that! Thank you for the comment, Charles!

  • Danna Schmiedt
    Posted at 10:18h, 16 August

    Even though our crops are somewhat sparse because of the drought here in California, at least we don’t have mud – unless our farmer, or his neighbor, forgets to tell us he just irrigated. But a lot of them don’t have water, so that’s not a big challenge, either.

    • Steph Osowski
      Posted at 09:24h, 17 August

      Thank you for the update and insight from California, Danna! I’ve not traveled around much of California, just LA, but it’s certainly on my list. Hope you stay dry and can get your crops off without a hitch.

  • Dan McGrew, now of North Carolina
    Posted at 14:15h, 16 August

    Another wet summer up north. Spent June and part of July in traveling Colorado, wyoming, South Dakota, North Dakota and Montana in 2015 — when constant rain produced more grass pollen than ever seen before.
    First allergy problem since the early 60s in Arizona’s low desert from dust and pollen from several years brought up by monsoon floods and then sun dried.
    That far north grass had everyone sick from allergies with WalMart totally sold out of over the counter allergy medications.
    By te way, Danna, with a name likely from Kings County — California is going to be short of water, even in the best years — simply because of over population.
    L.A.’s Metropolitan Water District is going to be forced to build massive desalinaiaation plants. The Monterey Peninsula has had a desal plant in operation nearly 20 years.
    There is a source of fresh water available, but getting it to the Central Valley will cost at least $20-Billion.
    Same for Texas and Eastern New Mexico.
    Arizona is just out of luck. Unless they can build a major desal project in the Gulf of California tidewater at YUMA and pump that water into Pinal and Pima counties.
    Believe it or not, even the urban centers of much of the East Coast have water shortage problems.

    • Steph Osowski
      Posted at 09:24h, 17 August

      Thanks for your comment and insight, Dan!