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oklahoma Tag

Wheat harvest for Misener Family Harvesters has officially started and it sure didn't take long to get back into the swing of things.

Yesterday we drove three combines, tractor and grain cart, and two semis to our first stop on the 2012 trail. We started south of Elk City, Okla., and cut around 160 acres. Not too bad for our first day. The wheat averaged about 11 percent moisture, 61 pound test weight, and around 30 to 35 bushels per acre. Compared to last year, the wheat is considerably better, like night and day.

Our First Day!
Dan took this picture yesterday. The farmer is right behind us with the tractor working the field.

Harvest hasn't quite started for the Misener Family, so we're keeping busy with things around the shop. Some of the things we're doing is inspecting our combines, tightening chains and belts, doing some preventative maintenance by changing bearings that are nearly worn out, and cleaning cabs. Some might find this a little tedious, but this is the kind of work that keeps us running in the fields when harvest is in full bloom. No breakdowns in the fields means more wheat we can cut in a shorter amount of time. Not only do we appreciate this, but our customers appreciate it even more. It's nice to know your whole livelihood is gathered up and no longer sitting in the vulnerable field. 

The Miseners have been very busy since my last post in December and I have some catching up to do!

Nothing has really changed for us because we're still up and down the roads. After we made the long haul home after the 2011 fall harvest we took a well deserved vacation to Montana to spend the holidays with my grandparents. We also headed to Grand Island, Neb., for the U.S. Custom Harvesters Annual Convention. We had a chance to see and catch up with our fellow harvesters.

Rain has halted wheat harvest progress in parts of Texas and Oklahoma, but was welcomed as portions of the area are still in need of moisture. Overall, the wheat crop remains ahead of schedule and has been reporting above average yields in places.

Texas – Portions of South and West Texas received up to six inches of rain last week while other areas only received scattered showers. Wheat and oats are being green chopped or baled for hay, and many grain producers have began harvesting or are preparing for harvest. Several who have started to harvest have reported above average yields. The High Plains is seeing irrigated wheat in good condition, while dryland wheat remains in need of moisture. In North Texas harvest was on hold due to rainy conditions.

Oklahoma – Harvest continues to progress, but weekend rain showers stopped combines in southwestern Oklahoma. Wheat in the Panhandle is still in need of rain, although the state received rain in portions of South Central and Southwest districts. Cooler temperatures in the mid to low sixties have continued to halt harvest. Conditions have been rated mostly good, and 80 percent of wheat heading is in soft dough stage—44 points ahead of t he five year average.

I was watering our trees and plants in Elk City, Okla., at our home and something very strange happened to me. I started to get wet and my first thought was using the water hose in my hand to defeat the person who dared get...

My previous two posts have hopefully brought everyone up to speed on Roland Harvesting, I'll continue to keep everyone up-to-date for the next couple of posts and then we'll all be caught up. As I've said before wheat harvest can be a busy time for...