All Aboard Harvest | Sage: Back in Texas
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Sage: Back in Texas

Sage: Back in Texas

Dumas, Texas- We got back to the harvest last night, after taking a detour through our future stops along the way.

One of our truck drivers, John, flew out of Denver to go to a wedding.  He bought the ticket before we even left Cut Bank because we figured we would be close to Denver by the first of July.  So we (I say we because the whole family came down; Mom, Dad, Sierra and I) flew into Denver to get the pick-up John drove up to the airport.  While in the Denver area, we went and visited one of the farmers we would be cutting for, and got a glimpse of how long it will be until it is ready to go.

After that we started our journey south to Dumas, Texas, and while on the road dad got a call from our straw boss Scott.  He said they had to shut down because they ran into some wet wheat, but dad figured we would be going sometime today.

That was before the rainstorm this morning.

We went out to the field and moved the combines to another job where the wheat will be ready to cut, as soon as it is dry enough now.  The forecast doesn’t look good, though, as they are predicting rain all day today and a little bit tomorrow. But it wouldn’t be the first time the weather people have been wrong this summer.

So now we are in hurry up and wait mode.  We have about three or four more days of cutting here and Colorado won’t be ready for at least a week.

I hope everyone has a good and SAFE holiday weekend!

Sage Sammons can be reached at sage@allaboardharvest.com. All Aboard 2010 Wheat Harvest is sponsored by High Plains Journal and DuPont Crop Protection.

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2 Comments
  • pro farmer
    Posted at 17:47h, 04 July

    awsome equipment

  • John Browne
    Posted at 01:38h, 06 July

    Is it rain spun off from that hurricane? 64/lb bushels is amazing for dryland! What kind of upper moisture limit do the elevators require there? When I drove combine in Washington State it was 12%, I think… but I don’t remember if it was different for red & white (& barley… we cut some of that, too). Interesting blog… kinda takes me back. ^..^