All Aboard Harvest | Kimberly Neumiller
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Kimberly Neumiller

Kimberly Neumiller

 

My name is Kimberly Neumiller from Neumiller Harvesting. I grew up in the small town of Fessenden, North Dakota, which is 25 miles from where I live now. My husband, Mychal, and I along with our two kids, Bentley and Payzlee, live near Bowdon, North Dakota.

 

Neumiller Harvesting is a family-owned operation that started in 1984 with Roger Neumiller combining for people around home and continued when his sons were old enough. Mychal and his cousin were the first ones to take the journey south in 2004 with one combine. That is when Neumiller Harvesting was created.

 

As the years went on Neumiller Harvesting added a few more machines and more employees. Today, Roger, Mychal, Cole, and Logan, along with their families, start the harvest journey in Texas with 10 Case combines, three Haul Master grain carts, and 15 semis. We are usually split up with machines running in four different areas. Our run continues through Oklahoma to Kansas, over to Colorado, then up through Nebraska and back to North Dakota.

 

We harvest spring wheat, winter wheat, canola, and durum in the summer and soybeans and corn in the fall. In the past years we have also done lentils, chick peas, and barley. Our fall harvest stays in North Dakota and we usually add a few more employees, another combine, and a grain cart. So, in total we will have 11 Case combines and four Haul Master grain carts running during fall harvest. In addition to the family, we will have about 20 employees. I am always treating them as one of my own because I know what it is like to be away from your family.

 

We are so grateful for all of our employees; some have been with us for six years and some employees will stay during the winter months to help in the shop or truck.

 

We have a small rain delay here in North Dakota. As much as we need the moisture, we wish it would have held off a few days. The Westhope crew got lucky and finished the beans before the rain but the Esmond and Jamestown crew may not get fired back up for a few days. If the rain had held off a few more days we could have gotten all of our bean acres done for the year.
The Esmond crew finished one farmer and has moved to another farmer but fell a few hours short of finishing. We have been

Fall is my favorite time of the year, leaves changing colors, the cool crisp mornings, and fall harvest. Although it is fall, our weather does not make one believe it is. We have been in the 80s all week and even hit 96 degrees the first day we started beans around home. This weather is making bean harvest go rather quickly, that and the minimal rain we have received. The beans around home, near Bowdon, North Dakota, were not running as good as the beans up in Westhope or even Donnybrook so we have been able to cover a lot

September 19 was a day that we can tell people we combined soybeans and corn for the first time ever. Usually, soybeans are combined before corn but with the way mother nature has been here in North Dakota things are a little different. A few years ago, we actually were combining corn in March because we had so much moisture and snow that we were unable to do it at the normal time. Every year is something different but we learn to roll with it. Because of the year we have had we are actually combining some beans that are

North Dakota the state where Mother Nature is very unpredictable. As many of you know North Dakota has been hurt by severe drought this past year. This past winter only brought maybe a foot of snow for us here in Bowdon—if not less then that—and no measurable rain from August 2020 until August 2021. The third week of August we finally started getting some moisture. Although it was too late for the summer crops, it has helped the soybeans to an extent and helped the corn finish filling the cob and hopefully adding test weight. We are so grateful for