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Holdrege, Nebraska – I got home from North Dakota on September 11th and started cutting soybeans on September 13th. Fall harvest was quickly in full swing which made me very happy! I cut for 16 consecutive days and had big dreams of harvesting all fall without any stops.  Mother Nature has held us up recently. We’ve had some rain delays and it just pushes us back.

All I want to do is be in the field all day every day until we finish harvest (typically in November sometimes December). I’ve been fighting the weather almost the entire harvest season (May

Cheyenne, OK - We wrapped up our wheat harvest season on September 11 in Cut Bank, Montana.  The timing of harvest almost always differs from year to year, but I think this was the longest season we have ever had. It's been full of highs and lows, ups and downs, the good, the bad and the ugly...which is just the nature of the beast. I hear often that the harvest trail isn't for the faint of heart, and I couldn't agree more. In spite of it all, we're truly thankful for every acre we’ve run

Let us know what you thought of this year's program and you'll be entered in the giveaway. We'll be giving out 5 harvest canvas prints. The survey will close Monday, Oct. 8. Your feedback is greatly appreciated and will help us improve next year's program.

Click HERE to fill out the survey or you can fill out the one below.

Park, Kansas - The crew has made it back to our headquarters in northwest Kansas. It was a nearly immediate change over, service, and now they are in the field picking high moisture corn and soybeans. Its crazy how quickly things move and that it is already time to start the next season of crops. The weather has been favorable regarding moisture in many parts of western and northwest Kansas this summer, so we are expecting strong yields in many areas. Most acres we harvest in the fall consist of grain sorghum, corn, and soybeans, but we are open to other

Can it really be over?!? Wheat harvest 2018 was as memorable as they come for Jones Harvesting, for all the right (and wrong) reasons. Watch the summary video below to relive the highs (and lows) of the summer, the most memorable photos, the best footage and catch one more glimpse of the sun setting on amber waves of grain.  Then continue reading on as I share details of the final journey back home, readjusting to life on the farm, gearing up for fall harvest, and the preparations already being made for wheat harvest 2019.



It's amazing how fast time goes

Lindsey Orgain

Orgain Harvesting

Lindsey Orgain is somewhat new to the harvest trail.
She and her husband, Jason, have Orgain Harvesting in Cheyenne, Oklahoma.
It is the 11th season in the business, but it was in 2014, two years after she married Jason, that Lindsey decided to quit her job and come aboard full-time for the annual harvest journey.

Brian Jones

Jones Harvesting

For 35 years, Jones Harvesting, based near Greenfield, Iowa, has made an annual trek from Oklahoma to North Dakota, harvesting golden fields of wheat for farmers who have become like family to the Jones family.

Tracy Zeorian

Z-Crew

Tracy Zeorian has followed the ripening trail of wheat since she was 12 years old.

Zeorian’s grandparents, Elvin and Pauline Hancock, had been making the annual harvest run from Texas to Montana since 1951.

Janel Schemper

Schemper Harvesting

Janel Schemper was 6 months old when she made her first harvest journey.
“Harvest for me is a way of life,” the third-generation custom cutter said.
Schemper Harvesting, based in Holdrege, Nebraska, goes back more than a half-century, started by her grandfather.

Laura Haffner

High Plains Harvesting

For Laura Haffner, there is not a better way to see the Great Plains.

She and her husband, Ryan, have High Plains Harvesting based in Park, Kansas. The couple, along with their two young children and a crew of about a dozen, travel from Texas to the Canadian border to harvest wheat, canola and peas.