All Aboard Harvest | Steph: Hello again, Hemingford
6902
post-template-default,single,single-post,postid-6902,single-format-standard,qode-quick-links-1.0,ajax_fade,page_not_loaded,,qode-theme-ver-11.2,qode-theme-bridge,wpb-js-composer js-comp-ver-5.4.7,vc_responsive

Steph: Hello again, Hemingford

Steph: Hello again, Hemingford

StephNEW_thumbnailOut of the 6 stops Osowski Ag Service makes for harvest in the south, we are now on our sixth and final stop in Hemingford, Neb. This is certainly one of those summers where you wonder where the time went. I always used to laugh at my parents when they would talk about time flying by so fast but I think I am starting to understand now.

We left our previous stop, Big Springs, Neb., on Friday and traveled to Hemingford, which is only a couple hours north. We arrived and unloaded all the equipment and got the camper set up, not knowing if we would be able to get right into the field again or not. Dad went to check the fields and sure enough, the wheat would be ready to go bright and early the next day! The following day, we roaded equipment the 25 miles out to the field. From the highway, the road that takes you to our fields is the perfect picture of “minimal maintenance.” Mom and I were making jokes today that until you get to the end of this windy and bumpy road, it looks like ground where only cattle could roam. However, at the end of this road, there are 2 irrigated pivots where the wheat has been yielding 73 bushel average, protein between 13-15, and test weights around 60. With stats like that, we have decided the trip down to the field is worth it.

No matter the good spirits we find ourselves in, the rain clouds can still leach their way across the sky and above our little “corner of the world.” I was in town with a load and on my way back out to the field when Brandon called, saying it was pouring at the field and that my return wouldn’t be necessary. Upon arrival, Mom, Dad and Brandon regaled their story of how they had to pull the service truck up the final hill climb that leads onto the highway because of how slimy the roads got from the rain. The amazing thing was that we were able to combine again the following day just past noon! But then it rained AGAIN that night. We were about to quit anyway since the straw was getting tough but quitting when you are forced to doesn’t give the same gratification.

Now that brings us to today, July 22nd. It didn’t rain much at our field so we are planning on combining right around noon. This time last year, we were already back at home and shining up equipment before the dust started flying around there. Harvest sure has a mind of its own!

Harvest Tip: If the roads are questionable leaving a field once it has rained and there is a full truck in the field, park it in a safe place and leave it there. In a battle with mud, mud almost always turns up the victor.
Rig #1.

Rig #1 – combine and hopper bottom.

Rig #2.

Rig #2 – tractor and grain cart.

Dad and Brandon tightening the straps on the grain cart trailer.

Brandon and Dad tightening some straps on the grain cart trailer.

A little tailgate break after loading equipment.

A little tailgate break after loading equipment.

Bosselman Truck Stop along I-80 in Big Springs. Busiest place we see on the run.

Bosselman Truck Stop. The busiest truck stop we see on the harvest run, which lies right along I-80 in Big Springs, Neb.

Line ahead of me at the elevator!

Line ahead of me at the elevator in Hemingford, Neb.

Line behind me at the elevator.

And the line behind me. You could say harvest is in full swing here.

This card gets scanned when I pull up to the probe and tells those in the scale house who we are cutting for.

This gets scanned when I pull up to the probe. It tells those in the scale house what my field name is and who I am harvesting for. When we switch fields, I must communicate to them through a speaker system and let them know to get it changed. Pretty slick system if you ask me.

Some stats! Truck drivers get these tickets to know which pit to dump at and gives us information on our load.

After being scaled in, truck drivers receive these tickets, telling them which pit to bring their grain to. It also has some handy stats on it.

Right before the rain came!

Hurry, before the rain comes!

Unloading on the go.

Dad hanging out with Petey while watching the harvest action.

Dad and Petey, hanging out and watching the action.

Purple, lookin' good at dusk.

Purple, lookin’ good at dusk.

If this isn't mom and dad bonding, I don't know what is.

Mom in the grain cart and Dad on the ladder, directing her so she knows when to pull forward. If that’s not bonding, I don’t know what is.

Combining at dusk.

Combining at dusk.

Yes I know, more sunsets...

Yes I know, more sunsets.

Brandon trying to race the rain.

Just one more round before we stop.

Those clouds sure look pretty, I must say.

I must say, the storm clouds were looking pretty beautiful.

Rather than sand on a beach, we use straw in a wind row!

Rather than sand on a beach, we have straw from a wind row! We improvise around here.

All Aboard Wheat Harvest is sponsored by High Plains Journal and Syngenta. You can contact Stephanie at stephanie@allaboardharvest.com.

5 Comments
  • Trish
    Posted at 17:34h, 22 July

    Welcome to Hemingford. The land of much wheat and long lines!

  • magne kåre tuhus,norway
    Posted at 18:12h, 22 July

    How many acres is a pivot?

    • Steph Osowski
      Posted at 00:28h, 24 July

      Thank you so much for the wonderful comments!!

      Sharon and Harry-Thank you for sharing your story! I will definitely keep the sunsets coming, I just can’t help myself anyway!
      Magne Kare Tuhus-There are 120 acres in a pivot!
      Trish-Thank you for the warm welcome! The lines move fast so they don’t bother me 🙂

      Best to all,
      Steph Osowski

  • Sharon and Harry Drake
    Posted at 21:16h, 22 July

    Glad all is going well. I would take the straw anytime to sand.
    Keep the sunsets coming. if anyone does not like it, I cannot imagine who would, they can look the other way. ha
    We have had 5-7 inches here in Cowley County, Kansas over the weekend. my it was nice! Came easy and steady. Course some had hay cut,but that is the way it goes.
    My parents almost always spent their wedding anniversary in the wheat or hay field. It was June 11. they were a few month short of 60 when Dad passed. They were always glad to be together.
    Be careful in your work. Sharon and Harry Drake, July 22, 2013

  • Kory
    Posted at 08:26h, 23 July

    wow, some really cool pictures with the sun set and storm coming in.