All Aboard Harvest | Stephanie
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Stephanie

Grafton, North Dakota–Whenever there's any lull in conversation at a family gathering, you can bet a harvest story is brewing out of one of us. They are our go-to. We've always said we should have written a book so I suppose these blogs are the...

Grafton, North Dakota—The buzz in the air around our little town is tangible during wheat harvest. The smell of the tiny bits of wheat chaff billowing around in the air, the hustle and bustle at dealerships and gas stations alike, the trail of grain running...

Spring has sprung, and it holds one of the best universal messages: Even though it’s sloppy and unpredictable, change has arrived and it will only get better from here. For those of you who don’t know me, my name is Stephanie (Osowski) Cronje. You could say...

Scranton, North Dakota - On one corner, the wheat is days away from being ready to cut. Across the road, the field is grass green and won't be ready for weeks. A hop and a skip down the road, wheat is being swathed and baled. When the insurance company is paying the farmer to bale rather than harvest, how could you say no? It's tough for me as a harvester to type that, but I also understand profit margins. Don't be surprised if harvest crews add some instruments and a hot dog stand to their crew. Just imagine, the crew/band playing some country music and selling hot dogs in the wheat field. Combines park strategically around the bandstand, passing the time before the wheat ripens. Sounds pretty awesome, actually.

Alliance, Nebraska - Okay, tell me honestly; if I were to have a fleet of pink cabovers with white hopper bottoms that coincidentally have pink polka dots, how do you think that would go over? It was a thought-out-loud I had the other day and every member of the crew has a different opinion. I know a certain little harvest girl (Miss Carley Russell) who would be the first in line to drive one.

I'm writing this from a hotel in Alliance, Neb. With my family, we cut in Hemingford for many, many years so this area is all too familiar to me. This morning/afternoon in Pine Bluffs, we took duels off the combine, loaded up the combine, loaded up the grain cart, and fixed a valve on the grain cart trailer. It was HOT. Everything we touched was all but smoking from the heat and the cloud cover that would sporadically bring us shade brought out an audible sigh of relief from all of us.