All Aboard Harvest | Steph: Harvest continues in Hemingford
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Steph: Harvest continues in Hemingford

Steph: Harvest continues in Hemingford

StephNEW_thumbnailThe last couple days have yet again had the “hurry up and wait” theme running through them. With the high humidity and little showers the Hemingford, Neb. area has been receiving, we haven’t been able to begin our days till around noon. Want to hear something crazy? It actually gets chilly enough at night to where we have been scavenging through our different vehicles for sweaters and jackets! This also means that it gets tough for the combine to thrash the wheat, causing us to quit around 9/9:30 each night. We have seen yields from 20-40 bushels in dry land and up to 100 in irrigated, test weights around 60 pounds, and protein around 13.

At the elevator in Hemingford, there are 5 different pits to unload at: A, B, 2, 3, and GP (which stands for ground pit). I can now say I have unloaded at every single one this year. For some reason, this is always a goal of mine. Each pit has a purpose. After the load is probed and scaled, it is determined which pit you are sent to based on protein content, moisture percentage and test weight.

It has been me and Purple against the world until the last couple days where in the morning shuffle of equipment, Dad has hopped in Purple and I haven’t been able to get back in since we are never at the field at the same time! So Petey and I have been forced to get reacquainted. Not the worst thing but all the elevator workers have been asking me when I’m gonna get back in my purple truck!

Harvest Tip: When driving truck, know the stats from your loads at the drop of a hat. You never know when the farmer will ask for them and it makes you feel on top of things when you can rattle them off.

Boss man on the phone, doing boss man like things.

Boss man on the phone, doing boss man-like things.

Sugar beets in Nebraska!

Sugar beets in Nebraska!

Pile of stuff we remove while greasing/servicing equipment in the morning.

Pile of things we remove to protect them while we grease/service equipment in the mornings.

Have you ever had this before? It is phenomenal and you must try it.

This stuff is phenomenal. They have other flavors too. We are Osowski Ag Service and we approve this beverage.

My pretty Purple.

My pretty Purple.

Grain cart. King of the hill.

Grain cart. King of the hill.

Far away shot of Brandon cutting.

Far away shot of Brandon harvesting.

Gorgeous sight to see in my rearview mirror.

Gorgeous thing to see in the rear-view mirror!

Nebraska, well done.

Nebraska, well done.

Wildflowers in the ditch!

Wildflowers.

Storm clouds, taunting us from a distance.

Storm clouds taunting us from a distance.

All Aboard Wheat Harvest is sponsored by High Plains Journal and Syngenta. You can contact Stephanie at stephanie@allaboardharvest.com.

2 Comments
  • Tom Stegmeier/MC Harvesting
    Posted at 18:51h, 29 July

    I have a nick name for your purple KW.Casey, after the rodeo legend Casey Tibbs , purple was his trade mark!!! How many bu, can you haul legally with your tandem-tag axle set up? Here in Alberta tri drives are very common.
    Work Safe
    Tom & Sandi

    • Steph Osowski
      Posted at 00:57h, 31 July

      That is fantastic!!! I cannot believe I never thought of that…we can haul about 700 bushels with our tri-axle. We actually got the boxes done in Winkler, Manitoba so that’s funny you mention that!
      Thanks for your awesome comment and have a great day!
      -Steph Osowski