All Aboard Harvest | Steph: Back to work!
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Steph: Back to work!

Steph: Back to work!

StephNEW_thumbnailAs strange as it may sound, waiting for the wheat to dry is far more exhausting than harvesting. There is always something to be fixed, tweaked, perfected, modified, or even tore apart. It also means we are all under each other’s feet. The type of restlessness that settles amongst a harvest crew with nothing to harvest is unlike any other. This is why I am overjoyed to report that we are back in the fields! We weren’t able to start until 5 p.m., but we were able to go until 11 p.m. and will start as early as the humidity will allow come morning.

When we headed out of town this afternoon, the boys told me they would be “right behind me” and that Purple and I were to head straight to the field. Now first of all, they left before me, so this situation was doomed from the get-go, because they were never actually behind me. I got out to the field and sat for a half hour, having not seen hide nor dust signifying their imminent arrival. Rather than sit idle, I walked the half mile or so to the combine, drove it to the next piece where my truck was, cut out a spot to park trucks, got a sample ready to take to town, and the boys STILL hadn’t arrived at the field. I had waited over an hour. Recall that they were going to be “right behind me.”

Ladies, we have all heard that song “Waiting on a Woman.” However, any woman involved in agriculture knows that we wait on the men just as often, and often for longer periods of time. The funny thing about both scenarios is that even though we will joke, blog, and vocally complain about it, we all know that we will continue to wait as long as we have to.

Also, fun fact, I learned how to play two-handed Pinochle today from one of our Kansan friends! You can bet if there is ever some down time in the field, dad and I will be playing on the end gate of the service truck.

Harvest Tip: Keep in mind that time is a relevant concept. Everyone has a different interpretation of “a little bit.”

Giving Purple some TLC.

Giving Purple some TLC.

All shined up!

All shined up!

Kansas countryside.

Kansas countryside.

Back to work!

Back to work!

Brandon, cutting away.

Brandon cutting away.

Some shadow work.

Some shadow photo action.

Purple at dusk.

Purple at dusk.

All Aboard Wheat Harvest™ is sponsored by High Plains Journal and New Holland Agriculture. Steph can be contacted at stephanie@allaboardharvest.com.

 

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