All Aboard Harvest | Lindsey: May Madness
17463
post-template-default,single,single-post,postid-17463,single-format-standard,qode-quick-links-1.0,ajax_fade,page_not_loaded,,qode-theme-ver-11.2,qode-theme-bridge,wpb-js-composer js-comp-ver-5.4.7,vc_responsive

Lindsey: May Madness

Lindsey: May Madness

Photo Credit: Lindsey Orgain

A beautiful western Oklahoma sunset!

Cheyenne, Oklahoma–How are we already on the backside of May? I’m Lindsey Orgain with Orgain Harvesting in Cheyenne, Oklahoma. This will be my husband, Jason, and my 14th year on the harvest trail. We have known the end of our custom harvesting days was approaching. We have focused on expanding our farm operation at home, and thankfully we have been fortunate enough to add acres in the last couple of years. That makes being on the road for six months out of the year very difficult, expensive and stressful. One evening Jason told me, “I’m just tired of always being in a hurry,” and I could not agree more! Our oldest child, Mason, just finished his first year of school and our youngest, Ivy, is already 2 years old. It’s crazy how quickly these precious years are flying by! Jason and I are both ready to stay closer to home and transition to a full-time farming operation. As a result, our wheat harvest run is going to look quite different this year. We anticipate cutting in Oklahoma and Kansas, and then we will likely make our way back home.

Orgain Family

Photo Credit: Lia Hillman Media Fall 2018 Cotton

Photo Credit: Lindsey Orgain

Mason on his last day of Pre-K.

In the meantime, we are trying our best to make it all happen at home. We know it’s coming. It happens every year. But somehow the month of May always seems to hit us like a ton of bricks! This May has been no exception. The to-do list is growing by the day. The weather isn’t doing much to help us out either. I know here in western Oklahoma we’re usually praying, dancing, begging or doing whatever we can think of to make it rain at this point in the year. That certainly hasn’t been a problem this spring—just as soon as things start to dry out, it seems we are hit with another round of showers and storms. As a result, our planting schedule has been delayed and some of the wheat that we intended to swath and bale has become too mature to do so. Thankfully, we are faithful people—as farmers, how could you not be? We’ve made the most of our downtime with combine and truck maintenance and trying our best to get in some quality family time—which is usually hard to come by this time of the year. Another plus:The landscape is so pretty and green right now. It’s absolutely beautiful. A year ago we were waking up every morning with the fear of wildfires, so this has been a welcome change!

Photo Credit: Lindsey Orgain

Swathing wheat hay in Roger Mills County, Oklahoma.

Photo Credit: Lindsey Orgain

Photo by Lindsey Orgain.

Photo Credit: Lindsey Orgain

Photo by Lindsey Orgain.

Photo Credit: Jon D.

Sunset from the air seeder.

We are looking to fire up the combines around the middle of June. I’m excited to share our journey with you this summer! I’ll keep you updated on the crop conditions we encounter as well as sharing a little more behind the scenes stuff. There are definitely a lot of working parts to the harvest machine. All that lies between us and wheat harvest is planting and seeding about 3,000 acres and swathing and baling another 500 acres. No big deal … ha!

Photo Credit: Lindsey Orgain

Mason and Ivy.

Photo Credit: Lindsey Orgain

Supervising Dad.

All Aboard Wheat Harvest is sponsored by High Plains Journal and John Deere. Lindsey can be reached at lindsey@allaboardharvest.com.

2 Comments
  • Dan McGrew
    Posted at 12:09h, 30 May Reply

    Typical — Daddy holds the girl, Mom holds the boy.
    Makes an old timer (Gleaner operator 49-57) feel more better to see a farmer’s shirt tail tucked in solidly when he is getting down to work — without near total “southern exposure.”
    Sitting in retirement in North Central North Carolina, have been following national weather for two weeks. Realize I’m not really helping, but at least I know which town or county to pray for people’s safety.
    My mother was born between Roosevelt and Lone Wolf in the territory.
    Our ranch/deversified farm was between Broken Arrow and Coweta — right where multiple twisters drifted this past week.
    After living through three tornadoes personally, I left in ’57, then in 69 was in Stillwater when there were five on the ground about 11 p.m., going every direction.
    Will not return in tornado season. Yeah, they have me buffaloed!

  • john spencer ellis las vegas
    Posted at 10:18h, 06 June Reply

    Very nice article, totally what I needed.

Post A Comment