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One of our sponsors this year for All Aboard Fall Harvest is US Custom Harvesters, Inc. USCHI is an organization that began in 1983 and represents and promotes the harvesting industry and those who harvest. Members are harvesters who do not only grain harvest but also work in cotton and forage harvesting. Associate members are made up of companies who provide products and services to harvesters. Between these groups, they rally one time a year during the USCHI convention to share new ideas, products, and equipment and machinery, and advancements in technology.



Convention for USCHI is incredibly busy in the

Fall is my favorite time of the year, leaves changing colors, the cool crisp mornings, and fall harvest. Although it is fall, our weather does not make one believe it is. We have been in the 80s all week and even hit 96 degrees the first day we started beans around home. This weather is making bean harvest go rather quickly, that and the minimal rain we have received. The beans around home, near Bowdon, North Dakota, were not running as good as the beans up in Westhope or even Donnybrook so we have been able to cover a lot

September 19 was a day that we can tell people we combined soybeans and corn for the first time ever. Usually, soybeans are combined before corn but with the way mother nature has been here in North Dakota things are a little different. A few years ago, we actually were combining corn in March because we had so much moisture and snow that we were unable to do it at the normal time. Every year is something different but we learn to roll with it. Because of the year we have had we are actually combining some beans that are

Northwest Kansas—The summer wheat run is complete. There's always a feeling of relief when the last team member pulls in the yard with the final piece of equipment from the summer run. The crew immediately switched out and converted equipment for the fall season. Corn harvest has been underway for several weeks now.

What a run it was. This year was marked with many twists and turns and unexpected challenges caused by weather. I would rehash all those adventures, but I thought I would do a little something different this year.

I've said before that one of the



This is a beautiful time of year. Leaves around home are starting to turn, and while we have had 80-degree weather here this weekend, last week brought on cold nights and cool mornings. We were close to getting our first frost one night, and while it’s maybe a little early for frost, it’ll be happening soon.

Growing up in Georgia I didn’t witness a lot of extremely cold weather, and I didn’t get to see much snow. Except in 1993, when we had a blizzard so bad everything shut down for about three days. Around here, that’s just

Nebraska—This season I've had a theme and pleasure of introducing other crews and industry professionals to the readership. I hope you've enjoyed learning about them. This will be my final crew highlight for the summer run with the exception of my final post of the season which will have a different twist as well.

Meet Briggs Harvesting.

On the day we met, he emerged from his truck with a bounce in his step and twinkle in his eye. I got the sense that I may need to be on my toes with this one and I was right

Lindsey Orgain

Orgain Harvesting

Lindsey Orgain is somewhat new to the harvest trail.
She and her husband, Jason, have Orgain Harvesting in Cheyenne, Oklahoma.
It is the 11th season in the business, but it was in 2014, two years after she married Jason, that Lindsey decided to quit her job and come aboard full-time for the annual harvest journey.

Brian Jones

Jones Harvesting

For 35 years, Jones Harvesting, based near Greenfield, Iowa, has made an annual trek from Oklahoma to North Dakota, harvesting golden fields of wheat for farmers who have become like family to the Jones family.

Tracy Zeorian

Z-Crew

Tracy Zeorian has followed the ripening trail of wheat since she was 12 years old.

Zeorian’s grandparents, Elvin and Pauline Hancock, had been making the annual harvest run from Texas to Montana since 1951.

Janel Schemper

Schemper Harvesting

Janel Schemper was 6 months old when she made her first harvest journey.
“Harvest for me is a way of life,” the third-generation custom cutter said.
Schemper Harvesting, based in Holdrege, Nebraska, goes back more than a half-century, started by her grandfather.

Laura Haffner

High Plains Harvesting

For Laura Haffner, there is not a better way to see the Great Plains.

She and her husband, Ryan, have High Plains Harvesting based in Park, Kansas. The couple, along with their two young children and a crew of about a dozen, travel from Texas to the Canadian border to harvest wheat, canola and peas.