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Western Kansas: Little Man and Lady A were so excited to see their dad when we pulled into the field that Friday. It had been exactly 5 weeks and 6 days since they had seen him which is a new record. Nothing takes the place of dad, but I’m also grateful for the positive male role models on the crew, our family and community that had a kind word for the children or showed them a little extra attention during those days he was gone. There’s a lot of sacrifice that goes into this business for all involved parties.

Ryan

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Each trip with a happy ending is a blessing and I’m happy to report our North Dakota crew made it back to headquarters safely.

As previously discussed, the yields were strong in North Dakota this year. That is something to celebrate. However, weather and green crop stretched things out longer than they would have liked. A couple days down in the camper isn’t bad to get caught up on sleep, laundry and run a few errands. More than that, consecutively, can start to get on one’s nerves and frustration can set in. There’s only so many repairs to make, so

Greenfield, Iowa—Today I'm sipping coffee, looking out my window at the cows grazing in the pasture. I see corn and soybean fields in the distance, their color shifting from green to yellow and brown hues. A few leaves are starting to fall from the trees, and I hear a load of laundry tumbling in the dryer behind me. Fall is approaching, and wheat harvest has come full circle. After 77 days on the road we find ourselves back home.

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After over 2.5 months we are back at the beginning where it all started. It's a different feeling

Northeastern North Dakota—We recently had a nice change of scenery. We took a drive over to the International Peace Gardens. I didn’t even know it existed and my dad said he’d been there many years ago. So, LaVern, Carlene, Miss Moo and I made the trip over to Dunsieth, North Dakota (near highway 281). We crossed the border and Miss Moo has been next to the border before (because we’ve harvested fields just next to the Canadian border) but this time she made it to Manitoba! She’s been to many states and now another country! Way to go, Miss Moo

Northeastern North Dakota—We are harvesting spring wheat way up north now at what I call Combine City, USA. I’ve been coming here for about 20 years now and it’s always full of combines at wheat harvest time. Most of the work we do here is bin work.  The wheat we’ve cut so far made over 80 bushels per acre. The wheat and canola look very good here this year. The soybeans look great too. I haven’t seen any corn fields in this area this year. Last year I saw many fields of corn but heard it was all destroyed

Lindsey Orgain

Orgain Harvesting

Lindsey Orgain is somewhat new to the harvest trail.
She and her husband, Jason, have Orgain Harvesting in Cheyenne, Oklahoma.
It is the 11th season in the business, but it was in 2014, two years after she married Jason, that Lindsey decided to quit her job and come aboard full-time for the annual harvest journey.

Brian Jones

Jones Harvesting

For 35 years, Jones Harvesting, based near Greenfield, Iowa, has made an annual trek from Oklahoma to North Dakota, harvesting golden fields of wheat for farmers who have become like family to the Jones family.

Tracy Zeorian

Z-Crew

Tracy Zeorian has followed the ripening trail of wheat since she was 12 years old.

Zeorian’s grandparents, Elvin and Pauline Hancock, had been making the annual harvest run from Texas to Montana since 1951.

Janel Schemper

Schemper Harvesting

Janel Schemper was 6 months old when she made her first harvest journey.
“Harvest for me is a way of life,” the third-generation custom cutter said.
Schemper Harvesting, based in Holdrege, Nebraska, goes back more than a half-century, started by her grandfather.

Laura Haffner

High Plains Harvesting

For Laura Haffner, there is not a better way to see the Great Plains.

She and her husband, Ryan, have High Plains Harvesting based in Park, Kansas. The couple, along with their two young children and a crew of about a dozen, travel from Texas to the Canadian border to harvest wheat, canola and peas.