All Aboard Harvest | Uncategorized
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Wheat harvest for Misener Family Harvesters has officially started and it sure didn't take long to get back into the swing of things.

Yesterday we drove three combines, tractor and grain cart, and two semis to our first stop on the 2012 trail. We started south of Elk City, Okla., and cut around 160 acres. Not too bad for our first day. The wheat averaged about 11 percent moisture, 61 pound test weight, and around 30 to 35 bushels per acre. Compared to last year, the wheat is considerably better, like night and day.

Our First Day!
Dan took this picture yesterday. The farmer is right behind us with the tractor working the field.

Harvest hasn't quite started for the Misener Family, so we're keeping busy with things around the shop. Some of the things we're doing is inspecting our combines, tightening chains and belts, doing some preventative maintenance by changing bearings that are nearly worn out, and cleaning cabs. Some might find this a little tedious, but this is the kind of work that keeps us running in the fields when harvest is in full bloom. No breakdowns in the fields means more wheat we can cut in a shorter amount of time. Not only do we appreciate this, but our customers appreciate it even more. It's nice to know your whole livelihood is gathered up and no longer sitting in the vulnerable field. 

Rain has halted wheat harvest progress in parts of Texas and Oklahoma, but was welcomed as portions of the area are still in need of moisture. Overall, the wheat crop remains ahead of schedule and has been reporting above average yields in places.

Texas – Portions of South and West Texas received up to six inches of rain last week while other areas only received scattered showers. Wheat and oats are being green chopped or baled for hay, and many grain producers have began harvesting or are preparing for harvest. Several who have started to harvest have reported above average yields. The High Plains is seeing irrigated wheat in good condition, while dryland wheat remains in need of moisture. In North Texas harvest was on hold due to rainy conditions.

Oklahoma – Harvest continues to progress, but weekend rain showers stopped combines in southwestern Oklahoma. Wheat in the Panhandle is still in need of rain, although the state received rain in portions of South Central and Southwest districts. Cooler temperatures in the mid to low sixties have continued to halt harvest. Conditions have been rated mostly good, and 80 percent of wheat heading is in soft dough stage—44 points ahead of t he five year average.

This year marks a special year for Hoffman Harvesting. It’s our 40th Anniversary! So we are celebrating this year with pride.

[caption id="" align="alignnone" width="500" caption="Our 40th Anniversary logo"]Print[/caption]

By now, you would think we would be done having surprises in our profession and know what to expect; however, we were proved wrong once again. This year came earlier than we ever remember. I kind of feel like we dropped everything and left May 5- but that isn't entirely true. Last year, I will confess that was the case for me. I came home to a debacle. So I made sure that I started getting ready earlier this year. The proof is in how much is packed in my camper. The more time you have- the more you pile in it!

 It's that time of year again. Time to get the combines rolling and the crews to the field.

The crews will be sharing their experiences as their custom crews move from Texas on north throughout the summer months.

We encourage all of our fans to be as interactive as possible. Our correspondents love to see your feedback. Follow us on Twitter, “Like” us on Facebook, and catch our videos on YouTube. We also have a Flickr account where award-winning photos from years past are located and where new photos will be uploaded. While we anxiously await new sights of harvest enjoy a recap of some of the best photos of last harvest.

Seven months ago my family and I left Elk City, Okla. to start our 2011 harvest season. It seems as if we should still be prepping for the long trip north, but instead I find myself trying to summarize the 2011 harvest and it is more difficult than I expected. I could say it was the best year ever, or that it was the worst - but I won't say either.

This year was, shall I say, interesting. It was stuck in the middle.

Soybean harvest went well, and the fire was our only difficulty. The 2011 corn harvest was no unlike soybeans and had its own difficulties.

In August a few storms went through with very high winds and heavy rain. This type of weather flattens smaller fall crops that are in their growing stages, and unfortunately once flat always flat. Corn cannot just spring back up. We spent our corn harvest picking up corn that was on the ground. In my opinion, weather wasn't the only factor - and the variety may have played a roll. I say this after seeing a field where two varieties were planted in one field flopping from one pass to the next. One variety was completely flat, the other was not. I suppose the one variety was not able to withstand the fierce weather conditions.

It has been super busy around the Misener Family household, and I can't believe how the time flies. Fall harvest has come and gone. The last time I updated you all we were kicking off fall harvest, but today I can officially say that the 2011 harvest season has come to a close. It's a bittersweet ending.

I wanted to share a few fall harvest stories, since this harvest was not without difficulties. My combine caught fire on the last day of cutting when chaff build up met a hot hydraulic line. It was dry, and windy so even a small fire can be bad. We had been taking precautions to avoid fires by blowing the excess chaff from the machine, but it apparently wasn't enough. Dan, Joel, Lee and I fought the fire as best we could and emptied all the extinguishers we had, but it wasn't enough. The 40 mile per hour wind helped this fire get out of control fast. The fire department did get called and while we waited for them we fought the fire with one shovel and our feet.