All Aboard Harvest | All Aboard
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All Aboard

Holdrege, Nebraska - Holy cow!  It’s springtime already, and there are no more days off.  Harvest is quickly approaching, and there is so much to do and so little time.  It’s always a stressful time of year trying to get everything ready for harvest.  I certainly have feelings of not only stress but also fear and anxiety during this time of year due to having to hire the crew too.  I have been going on harvest my entire life.  However, it’s a big job getting ready for harvest - no doubt about it.  I am blessed though because of who I get to go to harvest with!  No joke.

 

Park, Kansas -  I had a funny feeling this year that we may catch a late cold snap, however, if someone would have told me we would have a good old fashioned prairie blizzard starting April 29th, I probably would have shaken my head.  Freeze yes, blizzard no.  But blizzard AND freeze are what happened in western Kansas where our headquarters is located. 

It was quite an ordeal for our crew as they come from various winter weather backgrounds (some with none).  Albert, one of our returning veterans, said, "The blizzard was definitely a surreal experience.  Only saw that on TV normally.  Being stranded without electricity and water made you appreciate the small things in life more, the stuff we normally take for granted.  And to be honest, I'm more of a sunny and blue sky kind of person!" 

I'm not sure which is more surprising to me, that it's nearly time for wheat harvest or that we are starting our third year as a member of the All Aboard Wheat Harvest family. Where has the time gone? I don't know about you, but sometimes I would like to just hit the pause button, even if for an hour or so!

I've been contemplating this opening post for some time and wish I had something incredibly insightful or clever to say. Truth be told, it has just been business as usual for our family over the last several months. However, as an adult, I've learned to be just as thankful for the times of regular little ups and downs as I am for those mountain top experiences.

Grafton, ND - Harvest time. I doubt there will ever come a time when I don't start mentally packing for it come mid-April. My mind will wander off, daydreaming about wheat fields, and next thing I know I'm checking my apps for wheat prices, weather reports for that first stop on the wheat run and yield projections. Some friends of mine started combining in southern Texas a week or so ago and were sending me Snapchats of their combines in the wheat... I got goosebumps.

For those of you new to the program this year, here's a quick synopsis of me. My name is Stephanie (Steph) Osowski. I'm a third generation custom harvester and am hopelessly addicted to the lifestyle. My family has always custom harvested so all my best childhood memories are either in a wheat field or somewhere along the wheat belt.

Manley, Nebraska - The old cliche' holds true...the older you get, the faster time goes. Jim and I have had numerous discussions regarding this thought. He doesn't agree with me and for that, I'm jealous. I am one that wants to hold onto the special events as long as I can and then try to recall every minute of it somewhere down the road. The years seem to zoom by and when I say, "I can't believe it's been 30 years ago that happened" - he'll say, "it seems that long ago". Maybe he's just denying the fact. Maybe he's got a better grasp on time than I do. Who knows. The fact is...I can't believe this is our 35th year of owning a combine and making the wheat harvest journey!
 


Holdrege, Nebraska - Hello!  I am Janel Schemper and this is my first AAWH blog.  I am a third generation custom harvester.  I've been going on harvest my entire life.  The 1950s was the start of my family business known as "Schemper Harvesting."  My grandpa, Jerry Schemper, was brave enough to leave his farm and went out on the road and made himself a living in the custom harvesting business.  My Dad, LaVern Schemper, is the oldest of six kids and is a second generation custom harvester.  I have a lifelong bond with my parents (LaVern and Carlene) and three older siblings (Julie, JC and Jared) through our family business.  The combine cab was where I spent my time with my Dad or siblings riding along with them and learned all about operating a combine. 

Monte Vista, Colorado - Mention Coors Light or Miller Lite and I would be willing to bet most readers of this blog will immediately think of this: [caption id="" align="alignnone" width="1024"] .[/caption]Rather than this:[caption id="" align="alignnone" width="768"] (Photo credit goes to Linda Lutz)[/caption][caption id="" align="alignnone" width="1024"]...